Weird Plant - Please Help Identify

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by April86, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. April86

    April86 Member

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    A friend of mine found this in Mission, BC and took it home. Neither of us have been able to figure out what it is. Anyone have any ideas?

    weirdplant.jpg


    Thanks for any help :)
     
  2. vitog

    vitog Contributor 10 Years

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    Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense) came to mind immediately, and a quick check of Google Images seems to confirm that. I usually identify it by the interesting flowers.
     
  3. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Hmm. Not sure what it is.
    However,it doesn't look right for Asarum canadense which has plain edges to the leaves, (entire) and leaf stalks which are very hairy.

    http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?i...b:IE-ContextMenu&rlz=1I7SUNA_en-GB&tbs=isch:1
     
  4. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    They remind me of young Ligularia leaves, maybe Ligularia dentata?
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Petasites.
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Petasites was my first inclination as well, but I was unsure about the newly emergent leaves in comparison to adult leaves.

    Maybe to add a bit of additional information -- where was the plant found (especially, what type of environment?)
     
  7. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    I second Petasites; I'm looking at the same emergent leaves in a patch of Petasites japonicus outside my window.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yep.
     
  9. April86

    April86 Member

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    It definitely seems to be petasites. Thanks everyone! :)
     
  10. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    That would be Petasites japonicus which is not a native plant here or am I wrong.
     
  11. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    I remember being told that petasites indicated a former Japanese home or settlement. I remember hearing that the stalks are edible but they taste like soap! Once planted, petasites spreads and is difficult to eradicate.
     
  12. togata57

    togata57 Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Not to be a wet blanket here...but I hope that this plant was not dug up and removed from an area in which it should have remained growing...?
     
  13. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Right, planted by Japanese immigrants as an early spring vegetable.
     
  14. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    Don't worry! The plant is tenacious and difficult to get rid of. I'm trying to in one corner of my garden so I know.
     
  15. togata57

    togata57 Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I am glad that the plant will likely be OK.
    However, my post concerned not the health of the plant, but another issue: digging up plants from state parks or other areas. Where was this plant found?
     
  16. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Sounds like an invasive plant that should be got rid of from the wild but your right no one should remove plants from the wild and at least have some knowledge of what your removing first.
     
  17. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The blue flowered Vinca is another indication of what were formerly, pre 1940s, farms and homes in the area. Now the main residential areas are built on those previous farms. Some of the trees they planted, of Japanese origin, are quite interesting.
     

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