Weeping birch uprooted - advice?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by noonataq, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. noonataq

    noonataq Member

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    My weeping birch, about 8 ft tall, was uprooted by the windstorm 2 days ago. I can't get anyone to replant it til next Wed (today is Friday).

    Any advice?

    Is there something I should do now?

    Is there something special that should be done on Wednesday?

    thanks
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You will want to keep the roots moist. However, value of re-planting it depends on why, specifically it blew over in the first place, and what condition it is in now. If its roots were badly deformed by careless container culture (before planting out) or rotted by hostile soil conditions, then standing it back up may not result in a successful recovery later.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
  3. noonataq

    noonataq Member

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    thinning a weeping birch after it toppled

    the weeping birch was blown over at a 45 degree angle from the ground. we had about 800 mm of rain in the month of november and 100 kph gusts of wind on the day it blew over. it is about 8 feet high with a heavy top. i raised the tree back to the vertical and secured it with 3 four foot steel rebar anchors driven in at an angle into the ground. i set up three guywires with turnbuckles from the top wad where the branches congregate. the guywires connect to the rebar in the ground . the tree is now anchored on three sides. i was wondering if i could trim out the leafless branches under the canopy and generally thin out the branches to lighten the top heavy load. the tree has only been uprighted and supported for a week. the temperature is down to minus 3 degrees celcius at night and about 5 degrees above during the day
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The critical point was and is what was going on at the roots. These should have been inspected for problems. Root bound nursery stock is very common here, if the soil does not drain adequately or is infested with pests or pathogens that are diminishing the tree idenfiying and correcting these problems will be likely to be required. If a planting is to last the full range of conditions, including what happens during wet periods must be allowed for.

    Reducing the top will reduce the ability of the roots to grow, growth of roots is supported by the top.
     

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