Wanted - the "perfect" townhouse tree

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by birke, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. birke

    birke Member

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    Location:
    Richmond, B.C., Canada
    Hello, I'm looking for suggestions for the "perfect" townhouse tree for Richmond, BC.
    This is our wish list:
    -low maintennance (low watering, min. pruning)
    - medium size (<30 feet)
    - narrow growth habit
    - roots that don't push up the sidewalk 5' from the trunk
    - attractive against a mostly white background
    - sandy and clay soil
    - sunny locations
    - longevity

    Thanks!
     
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    columnar hornbeam, although boring. Consider Styrax japonicus, with some pruning it can be managed as a small to medium sized tree. Acer griseum?
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    All of those exceed 30' in this region, although the snowdrop or the maple might grow for a long time and not get that high - it depends on how the individual specimen behaves on the site.
     
  4. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    How about Pyrus calleryana "Chanticleer"
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Over-planted, smelly in bloom, liable to exceed 30' and possibly apt to break up at some point.

    Vine maple might be successful, there are actually a number of cultivated examples in all kinds of situations in this region, that have mostly worked out pretty well. Frequent usage compensated for somewhat by variation in habit between individuals.
     
  6. Coyote Gardener

    Coyote Gardener Member

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    North Coast, OR, USA
    What about Eucryphia x nymansensis 'Nymansay' or 'Mt. Usher? Broadleaf evergreen, tolerant of a some wind and salt, tidy narrow habit and best of all, it is covered with apple-blossom like flowers in September when nothing much else is blooming so its great for pollinators.

    My other thought is Hamamelis × intermedia 'Jelena' ( I love orange), but other varieties of witchhazel are nice too.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2011
  7. roneill

    roneill Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Cercidiphyllum japonicum 'Red Fox' - slow growing, mature height of 20'-30', nice form and exceptional colour, would look striking against a white wall, fragrant foliage, sun to part shade, does need moisture but may well be worth it : )

    Happy shopping!
     
  8. Urban Eden

    Urban Eden Member

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    I agree - Styrax japonicus 'Emerald Pagoda' is a great choice. If possible plant it above a retaining wall so you can see it's summer glory from below - masses of fragrant white flowers. Underplant with woodland plants: ferns, hostas, Solomon's seal and epimediums - you won't be disappointed. It is disease resistant and tolerates poor soils. Mature size is 25' x 25'. Plant in full sun or part shade. A lovely specimen or even better in groups of 3. Enjoy!
     
  9. TMG

    TMG Member

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    Check out Parrotia Persica 'Vanessa'. See my post today. Narrow growth, 20 to 30 feet tall, beautiful seasonal interest.

    TMG
     
  10. Urban Eden

    Urban Eden Member

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    I see you're in Victoria ... where did you purchase Veronica? It's difficult to find in Vancouver.
     
  11. TMG

    TMG Member

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    I purchased them through our landscaper at Island View Wholesale Nursery (Tel: 250-544-4802). I've also seen them for retail at Russell Nursery (250-656-384) (www.russellnursery.com). Can also try Meadow Oak Nursery (250-655-1756). The ones I got at Island View were a good size (about 12 feet high and 6cm trunk), $275 ea.
     
  12. Jeff Koelewyn

    Jeff Koelewyn New Member

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    Hi Jonathan
    This is not a criticism but its interesting that you have identified this plant by its trademark and not by its actual variety name.
    Genericism is out of control in horticulture and 99% of people identify this plant by its trademark.This has huge ramifications because wholesalers like myself are not allowed to use the commonly used name for this plant
     
  13. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Jeff.
    Is "Glenns form" the appropriate name? I didn't think the plant was protected by pbr.
    Cheers
     
  14. Jeff Koelewyn

    Jeff Koelewyn New Member

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    Yes Jonathan, Glenns form is another cultivar name(synonym) used for this plant and no it doesnt have PBR. Never the less we are restricted from using the generic (common term for this plant) because it is technically a trademark
     
  15. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    Well this clouds the water somewhat. It appears that flemings have it registered.
    I've never heard of a cultivars name being registered trade mark
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  16. Jeff Koelewyn

    Jeff Koelewyn New Member

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    Location:
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    Thats right Flemings have a trademark on the words OCTOBER GLORY. As the trademark holder they are supposed to stop others using it generically or the trademark will lose its validity. In the U S it has lost its validity through extensive generic use.
    Do a Google search for Australia to see how Acer rubrum October Glory is recognised as opposed to Acer rubrum PNI0268 its "actual" variety name
    And yes ,you are absolutely correct a registered (or claimed trademark ie tm )CANNOT be used as a variety name
     

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