Virtual Garden Tour

Discussion in 'How's It Growing?' started by Margot, May 15, 2020.

  1. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    Coast garden tour « pot pourri »

    1. A mixed tray of sempervivum and friends (I have a little factory to put in to planters if there’s a gap) — the spiky one is very gentle silver grey called « sea urchin » (yes the name drew my attn)

    2. White daisy — name? @Margot ?
    I don’t know where it came from — it seeds medium freely - I estimate each flower is the size of Cdn / US quarter 25 cents coin. I keep it because bees like it.

    3. Same mystery daisy with aster leaves (will bloom in Sept) plus hosta Christmas Tree .... not very tall but sure grows wide (as per description) (I see some PJM rhodo leaves with their unique scent even today - and some columbine leaves (aquilegia) 2012 Eunice Fisher Distinguished Hybridizer Merit Award

    4. Vine maple seedlings - yes they volunteer - these are small 4 inch pots approx 2 yr old now. (Acer circinatum native to coastal BC and of course coastal AK , WA OR usa )
    @Acerholic was having a recent chat with @Keith Elliott in Shuswap about this plant (and Douglas maple)

    5. Coast wild elderberry (sambucus) for AcerH who recently posted a cultivated black one ... the little wild birds love these red berries @Acerholic

    6. Hère comes SANTA CLAUS! Truly the name of this somewhat hardy fuchsia

    OK In our climate - it got a bit frosted so to speak and not many blooms but maybe I can coax Santa Claus along for thé ride

    7. Coastal garden art with sempervivum —- good old thrift store salmon fish mousse molds !

    8. As above

    9. I am nuts about this one with its built-in Cobweb ... hen and chicks (some name tags say « candy floss »
    I find it a bit tender in the winter here

    10. More fish garden art from thrift — leaping thru blue waves of campanula and Solomon’s seal (the tall one) (and some invasive thimble berry native plant). And what I think is Lady fern — this is a good little video fr UBC Fac of Forestry



    ———-
    And that’s the tour du jour .
     

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    Last edited: Jun 17, 2021
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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Ted and Mary Greig Rhododendron Garden in Stanley Park. I have to figure out which and how many pink rhododendrons in bloom are either R. 'Aladdin' or 'Azor'. There are at least six that might be all different, maybe more. Or some that have the same names but look different. Some look half different, but I think I can tell when I'm looking at which in a different location. There is also something apricot coloured (which I am ignoring). And something with very very dark red flowers, about 2m across and tall, which I don't want to ignore, because I recognized it also in the West End. I will post them in the Stanley Park threads in the Ericaceae forum when I think I have seen all the possibilities. There are two more that are about to bloom that I'm pretty sure are going to be the same colour, but they're blooming around two weeks after the ones that are open now. R hemsleyanum is in bloom at UBCBG. I'll post that soon too, I hope.
     
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  3. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I did go to see the ones at the Stanley Park Pavilion, as I was at the north end of town to get my second shot at the Convention Centre. I felt very good all afternoon, smelled lots of nice roses, did not smell these, which are next to the side stairs of the pavilion, and which were at various stages of bloom.
    Dracunculus-vulgaris_StanleyPark-Pavilion_Cutler_20210617_143104.jpg

    My neighbour will make sure I'm alive tomorrow morning.
     
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  4. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    It’s today already - please let us know you’re here —

    In all seriousness - I am glad you’ve had the opportunity
    ————
    Back to plants - I am surprised the parks city gardeners would plant heavily scented (potentially unpleasant scents)
     
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm here, land of the living, neighbour checked in twice. Thanks.
    Most of the Dracunculus are in an area that people would just walk past, though the one I posted is right next to the stairs and around five meters from where there are tables on the restaurant deck. But as I said, it would seem to be bad luck to be there when the odor is apparent. I've been trying to catch the smell and haven't managed that yet.
    We could use some common names here, since I don't know the one @pmurphy used. From Dracunculus vulgaris - Wikipedia: dragon lily, dragon arum, the black arum, the voodoo lily, the snake lily, the stink lily, the black dragon, the black lily.
     
  6. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    Glad you're still among the living - I'm leaving in about 30 minutes to get my second shot.

    As for the smell, it is only noticeable if you are relatively close - say 2 - 3m - and only when it has just opened. That is also when most of the flies will show up, so it you see flies you can probably still smell it - I can't smell my large one any more and the smaller one only faintly (it's still attracting flies whereas the larger one is not).

    And when I got my plants (many years ago) they had the name "dragon's claw arum" attached to them
     
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  7. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good afternoon, I wanted to post my new Hydrangea 'Runaway Bride'. It was planted last September 2020, so it's very pleasing to see the white flowers today.
    Hydrangea Runaway bride 275.JPG Hydrangea Runaway bride 276.JPG
    And I thought a glimpse of my Zantedeschia aethiopica Arum Lily as it was just starting to flower.
    Zantedeschia aethiopica Arum lily 275.JPG
     
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  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    I promised Georgia last night that I would post some of my Hostas. So here they are from a few minutes ago. I have left our the ones that the slugs have got to this year, but hopefully I will be able to add these at a later date when some new leaves appear.
    Hosta Praying Hands 275.JPG Hosta Dragon Tails 275.JPG Hosta June 275.JPG Hosta Wiggles and squiggles 275.JPG Hosta Mouse ears 275.JPG Hosta Marmalade 275.JPG Hosta Snowflake 275.JPG Hosta Devon green 275.JPG Hosta Fire and Ice 275.JPG Hosta Guacamole 275.JPG Hosta Stained Glass 275.JPG Hosta Lakeside little tuft 279.JPG Hosta Fireworks 275.JPG Hosta Flavocircinales 275.JPG Hosta Midas touch 275.JPG Hosta Patriot 275.JPG Hosta Curly fries 275.JPG Hosta Revolution 275.JPG
    Praying Hands, Dragon Tails, June, Wiggles and Squiggles, Mouse Ears, Marmalade, Snowflake, Devon Green, Fire and Ice, Guacamole, Stained Glass, Lakeside Little Tuft, Fireworks, Flavocircinales, Midas Touch, Patriot,Curly Fries, and Revolution.
     
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  9. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    I am curious about your plant labels — are they bits of wood?

    What writing pen do you use (that remains legible - ie doesn’t fade)
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Hi Georgia, yes they are pieces of tree branches that have blown down through the Winter in our local area, I then cut them in half and mark with permanent marker pen.
    They do need replacing ever two to three years, but there is plenty of this around.

    D
     
  11. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    For plant labels I use scraps of vinyl siding easily cut to whatever size I want. These labels have lasted over 35 years.

    There are good permanent marker pens for labels available from some garden centres and tool stores. I think Lee Valley has some, but I got mine through Amazon. Just don't buy Sharpie (so called) permanent markers; none of them last more than a few months outside.
     
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  12. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I have used vinyl blinds for labels although it is difficult to write on a curved surface. For me, names written in soft pencil last a long time. I agree about Sharpies!

    Vinyl blinds are becoming harder to find now so I think I'll look for the scraps of vinyl siding you mention.
     
  13. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    My garden is looking much more green these days since the rhododendrons have mostly stopped blooming. I noticed this year that many of them bloomed over a longer period of time with some buds still opening while others had already faded.

    1. Rhododendron "Mrs. T.H. Lowinsky'
    2. Clematis jackmanii
    3. Phygelius 'Moonraker'
    4. Thymus vulgaris
    5. Romneya coulteri
    6. Romney coulteri (out of control)
    7. Allium cernuum (BC native onion)
    8. Astilbe 'Bridal Veil'
    9. Japanese iris and Gaura lindheimeri
    10. Sempervivum tectorum
    (Never had more than 2 flowers before this year.)


    R. 'Mrs. T.H. Lowinsky' 06-2021.JPG Clematis jackmanii 06-2021.JPG Phygelius 'Moonraker' 06-2021.JPG Thymus vulgaris 06-2021.JPG Romneya coulteri 06-2021.JPG Romneya coulteri 06-2021 (2).JPG Allium cernuum 06-2021.JPG Astilbe 'Bridal Veil' 06-2021.JPG Japanese iris and Gaura lindheimeri 06-2021.JPG Sempervivum tectorum 06-2021.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2021
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  14. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    It's going to be a hot day - and only get hotter in the days to come - so I went out early to water this morning.

    Common cattail - kind of proud of this one as it has finally decided flower (collected these from my mother's property - in her swamp - a few years ago)
    Clematis - my "good deal" from last year; $2.99 clearance plant from Lowes
    Japanese iris
    Mountain laurel
    Pawpaw
    Fusion lily - Easter lily x leopard lily
    Grevillea
    Beauty berry
    Douglas asters - collected from my mother's property many, many years ago (unitentionally)
    Temperature in my covered garden at 10:00AM this morning...I'm afraid to go in there now...
     

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  15. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    It seems early for asters -
    We have them wild in late summer in Okanagan

    Your iris (white yellow pink) is very Georgia Okeeffe artist (New Mexico)

    I NEVER thought I would wish for some cool temp and —- dare I say it - rain!

    Georgia O'Keeffe - Wikipedia
     
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  16. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    I think my plants get spoiled with better living conditions (meaning they get watered every other day when it's hot).
    Anytime I bring something back from my mother's property (northwest of 100 Mile House) they always get much bigger and eventually seem to fall in line with my other plants growth-wise. I once brought down a bunch of alpine strawberries that are essential a ground cover growing in clay among the trees up there - cute little things that were maybe 6 - 8cm across for the entire plant. Those same strawberries now have individual leaves the same size as those original plants...
     
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  17. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    Update,
    I just took a photo of the monitor on the remote Garden thermometer...53C (and 33C inside our house)

    IMG_6796.JPG
     
  18. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    I have a question about easy-to-use garden hoses

    I have a couple of really “skookum” hoses for long distance (not dragging around to water)

    BUT - @pmurphy - it sounds like you “drag” a hose around to water

    Are you doing that with buckets?
    Or Hawes?

    The difficulty frustration I have is heaving these heavy good quality hoses around tender pots of lilies and corners etc

    I have looked at those “as seen on tv” type expandable hoses

    I am curious about what you use for your garden too @Margot

    Meanwhile I have a cobra spray mist going gently for the little birds

    The hummingbirds are cavorting au naturel with towhees :)

    Thank you
     
  19. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    Several years ago we installed underground sprinklers for the front yard and had drip systems throughout the gardens. The sprinkler system is still working but over time the drip systems clogged or broke down/became damaged and it just wasn't worth trying to re-do it so now we have 3 hose reel systems; 1 for the front yard (33 m so it's long enough that I can water the boulevard trees), 1 for the north side yard and entire backyard (again 33 m), and 1 in the Garden that also reaches up the south side yard (it's only about 22 m) but I can also use this one to spot water areas of the backyard, including the greenhouse where I have my pond and bog plants.

    I did try the expandable hose but after only a couple of months the fabric shredded and then the hose (supposedly "indestructable") split. Definitely not worth the price I paid. Now I used non-kink rubber hoses and they seem to be holding up well (one is going on 8 years now without issue). The only real issue I find with hoses is they tend to bend at the joint between the rubber and the metal end - we fixed this by taking an old "normal" hose and cutting 15cm pieces that we then split open and wrapped around the rubber hose with duct tape...no more bending.

    As for water for the birds, they have the waterfall and really enjoy it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2021
  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Ouchhhhh !! That is incredible P. I've been watching the heat you are experiencing on the news and I don't know how you are managing to keep your plants alive. 53°C is also dangerous for humans, so do keep as cool as you can and forget about watering the garden. I know that's difficult for us gardeners, but in theses extremes it has to be done.

    Keep safe

    D
     
  21. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    A town in Lytton, BC just broke the Canadian hottest temperature record at 46.1 (or more . . . the day's not over). This is not a record to to celebrate breaking. If only we could take it to the Olympics!
    Lytton, B.C. just broke the record for hottest temperature ever recorded in Canada

    We got up to 37C; hotter tomorrow.
    We're okay for the short term but I am very concerned about the risk of wildfires, our water supply, farmer's crops, vulnerable people . . . not to mention my garden.
     
  22. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    It is interesting to read the article that says it was 45° C in the 1930's. Not much difference to the temperatures you are getting now. It is easy to forget these other records as time goes by, especially as word of mouth disappears from ordinary people who can pass on their experiences.
    This is such a good thread that we can all share our weather around the world. It should be here for posterity also, unlike our ancestors words.
     
  23. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Two things stand out for me here:
    1. 45° C putatively set in the 1930s is actually much lower than the 46.6° C officially recorded today.

    2. The memories and experiences of people who have lived in such contentious areas matters too.
     
  24. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Tbh Margot I really wouldn't notice the difference between 45 and 46.6. As I don't notice the difference in 30 or 31 °.
    But you are experiencing something now I never have and don't want to, so I will accept what you say, that it is a lot more.

    D
     
  25. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    I didn't want to rub it in about our weather being so cool atm compared to others suffering a heatwave, so I just thought a couple of photos from my garden a few minutes ago to share.
    Katsura tree, new leaves.
    Katsura tree 287.JPG

    Fern Ursulas Red x2
    Fern Ursulas red 285.JPG Fern Ursulas red 284.JPG

    Hosta flavocircinalis in flower

    Hosta flavocircinalis 284.JPG
     
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