Vine question

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Canadianplant, Dec 19, 2009.

  1. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    I have a Syngonium podophyllum and a Scindapsus aureus (arrowhead vine and a pathos vine). I Read that they need something to root into to mature, and that most of us that have them, have them only in juvinile form. I also read that, the best way of doing this is by making a pole out of peat moss and chicken wire. Has anyone tried this??? OR has any other suggetions?? Ive tried cork bark..... they were pinned to the bark fer a yar and didnt attatch ( that could have been a lack of humidity)?
     
  2. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    you can make your own totem or buy one. a frame with moss on it or even just a piece of wood. my computer died, so i lost all info - had links for a couple places online that sell totems or bark/wood...

    it's correct that these species are usually still in juvenile form when grown indoors. for them to mature (and morph) they DO need to grow upwards, so, having something there in the pot for them is the best thing.
     
  3. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    Ive tried cork bark, and it didnt work :S They didnt root to it. Im assuming they have to put out their roots into what im trying to get it to grow
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Golden pothos furnishes smooth, armor-like coconut palm tree trunks in Waikiki. Growth behavior of such plants is like that of ivy, there is a smaller-leaved creeping phase that grows across the ground until a support is encountered, then climbs up that. After a time on the vertical surface larger, adult phase leaves (and flowers) begin to replace the sterile (non-flowering) juvenile growth. Specialized adhesive roots are used to cling to the surface.

    Another familiar, hardy climber showing the same behavior is Euonymus fortunei.

    With tropical climbing aroids the adult phase appears to be more likely under greenhouse conditions, more like those of the tropical outdoors than the average household interior. But I have occasionally seen older Monstera deliciosa exhibiting adult growth indoors. Leaves smaller than the outsize ones that are produced in the troplics, but still definitely of the adult type.
     
  5. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    So like with most houseplants, i need a little luck lol. THanks ron b.. merry christmas
     

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