Vancouver News: Bees to Benefit from Building Boom

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Junglekeeper, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,835
    Likes Received:
    524
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
  2. Pasquale

    Pasquale Active Member

    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    Great news! The Mason bee hit the front page! Just at the time when they start to emerge.
    Yesterday I saw the first male bee buzzing around the garden shed and many more are sure to follow in the next few days, I have several condo of these bees, they produce no honey but they are fun to watch and they make a great hobby. I really would like to know how many gardeners out there, which are tied to this forum have Mason Bees.
     
  3. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    North Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    I have seen big and fat bumble bees in my garden, no pix.... but what are they? Mason? They are big and fat!
     
  4. Pasquale

    Pasquale Active Member

    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    If they are big and fat they are definitive Bumble bees. Mason bees are slightly smaller than a honey bee and they are a dark blue metallic, they are also known as the Blue Orchard Bees, the male is smaller than the female and it is distinguishable by a marked white puff on the face.
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,835
    Likes Received:
    524
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
  6. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    505
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Dunbar area
    I set up my first mason bee house, using the plastic tubes and a package of bees from West Coast Seeds, today. We will see how it does. Historically I have just had bumblebees and - shudder - wasps.
     
  7. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,835
    Likes Received:
    524
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
     
  8. vickieg

    vickieg Active Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Last year I had a Flicker sitting right under my mason bee condo and as the bees emerged and fell to the ground the bird would eat them before the bee's wings had a chance to dry out and unfurl. I had to get chicken wire and make an elaborate fence to protect my newly hatched bees. I think the flicker got a high percentage!
     
  9. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,697
    Likes Received:
    226
    Location:
    Burnaby, Canada
    I've noticed that Flickers will also peck at the entrances of the larvae/pupae-filled tubes trying to get at them. Fortunately, they can't reach very far into the tubes; and evolution has instructed the bees to build an empty compartment at the entrance of each tube. Presumably, this minimizes the damage from flickers and other woodpeckers.
     
  10. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,835
    Likes Received:
    524
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada

Share This Page