Identification: Upright ornamental cherry tree

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by Yindee, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. Yindee

    Yindee Member

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    I live in south-west England. About 20 years ago I lived in the north-west of England and planted an upright ornamental cherry tree which bore deep pink blossom. I did not retain the tree label but believe that the common name was American Red Pillar. Local nurseries do not recognize this variety and I have searched the internet in vain. Can anyone help me to identify this tree?
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  3. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Did it look like 'Amanogawa', as seen in this thread?
    Amanogawa – pale pink doubles, green leaves, mid-season
    'Amanogawa' is sometimes known as pillar cherry, though it's never red, and I wouldn't even call it deep pink. Note that it has double blossoms (more than 5 petals) and the flowers face upwards.

    If I were naming things, I'd have given the name "American Red Pillar" to 'Rancho' - see
    Rancho - early mid season, single pink blossoms, upright, reddish leaves, but I don't know of its ever having been called that. It has single blossoms (five petals).

    You can search in the VCBF Neighbourhood Blogs for lots of examples of these two cultivars. I saw a lot of trees in England last year that we don't have here at all, so it may not be something we know about.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Based on name you gave plus your description probably Malus Velvet Pillar TM = 'Velvetcole' PP 4758 (1981). Unless it never made it to Britain, at least in time for you to buy it 20 years ago.

    A new and distinct variety of flowering crabapple tree, characterized by its rapid growth habit of numerous, compact, sturdy, upright branches, branching freely at the base; attractive purplish red foliage appearing resistant to scab and mildew; and sparse but pleasing purplish red flowers and dark red to deep purple fruits

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...50&s1=PP04758.PN.&OS=PN/PP04758&RS=PN/PP04758

    Elsewhere it is said to be very prone to scab.
     
  5. Yindee

    Yindee Member

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    Thanks for a speedy reply. We left that property over 13 years ago. The tree was a source of enjoyment for 12 or more years and was definitely a cherry tree. It came from a local nursery that closed down years ago. There's a housing estate there now. Such is modern life! If you have any further ideas, I would welcome them. Regards, Yindee
     

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