update: WA state hardy citrus 2020

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by SoCal2warm, Apr 3, 2020.

  1. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Active Member

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    Here's a seedling that came from a seed from an Ichang papeda x trifoliate cross PXL_20210227_003549325.jpg

    The leaves don't really look the best now, but they do look better than the Ichang papedas.

    Here's the tiny little Keraji seedling on its own roots that's been in the ground for a couple of years now. It really doesn't look well, but it will survive.
    PXL_20210227_003639288.jpg
    The leaves are pretty pale yellowish, and while not dead, are probably going to be non-functional. However the seedling will later grow new leaves. Basically this small seedling is barely hanging on.
     
  2. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Active Member

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    20201103_151829.jpg
    early ripening variety of Satsuma, surrounded by an insulated cold frame, in Vancouver, WA.
    The fruits did reach ripeness. picture is from early December
     
  3. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Active Member

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    update April 26, 2021

    Sudachi, starting to put out a new flush of leaf growth
    sudachi-Apr26,2021.jpg


    Ichang papeda, it got pretty pale and yellowish but many of the leaves are beginning to green up just a little bit now
    Ichangpapeda-Apr26,2021.jpg

    planted out in the ground, away from the house, both were left uncovered
    this was a relatively mild winter in terms of how low the temperature dropped
     
  4. Shabong

    Shabong New Member

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    Please update on your young citrus tree progress when you get a chance next spring. Recent purchased a yuzu and a sudachi plant. Planning to over winter them in the unheated garage in zone 7A. They are young tree so in ground might not be good now, but wondering if the minimum soil in these small pots will be even worse for them. Taking a little risk to test them out but if it’s too cold, maybe below 15F, Iggy bring them inside the house.
     
  5. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Active Member

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    I can provide an update. Both small Ichang papeda plants died. Two Yuzu plants died but two survive. One does not look so wonderful and I am not sure how it will fare in coming in years. I fear it might slowly decline, year after year, but right now it has regrown healthy leaves. It's only 27 cm tall. Another Yuzu is planted in a much more protected and optimal location and is doing great, over two feet (60 cm) high now. It looks like it will grow into a healthy big bush. A Changsha mandarin (on rootstock) planted in an optimal protected south-facing location among some thick bushes is doing great, and is over 3 feet high now. A small Changsha rooted from a cutting, and which was growing great at first, and a small Yuzu seedling both did not manage to survive, despite being wedged in a narrow area between two houses. Sudachi died off several years ago as well, but it was planted far out from the house (it appeared to handle the cold almost as well as the Yuzu that was planted right next to it). An Ichang lemon tree has managed to survive in a container left outside. I was surprised, because during an earlier winter it looked like the winter nearly killed it, but then during a later cold winter it managed to pull through and later be able to put out vigorous growth, despite some obvious damage. But that later winter where the Ichang lemon pulled through killed off a Bloomsweet in a container that was right next to it, despite that Bloomsweet making it through the previous winter better than the Ichang lemon. So I've now planted the Ichang lemon tree in the ground, in a protected spot near against the wall of the house. It's still less than 2 feet high. I'm sure it is the most vulnerable in the collection that has managed to survive. The Dunstan citrumelo is growing great, managed to keep all its leaves this year, and the leaves managed to eventually recover a healthy green color after looking very sickly yellow-green color. It is almost 3 feet high, a healthy bush. Bloomsweet and Keraji unfortunately do not seem to be able to survive in this climate, even given some protection. I had placed a large (1 gallon, 3.75 L) container of water up against each and covered them with a paper grocery bag during the coldest part of the winter. That was not enough to save them. And they were both planted on the south facing side of the house only a few feet away from the wall.

    I still see a tiny bit of healthy green at the base of the Ichang papeda x kumquat hybrid seedling, maybe only 2 cm, but it has not managed to put out any leaf growth this entire year or last year. Based on experience with other seedlings, I would not be surprised if it slowly declines after another year or two and eventually dies. But it has technically been able to barely cling on to life for several years in the ground. Whereas the bigger Ichang papeda x kumquat seedling that I thought was growing very well at first, surviving through one winter, completely died.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2023

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