Identification: Unknown fungus -- any ideas?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Spelunker, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Spelunker

    Spelunker Member

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    Hello!

    This large fungus was recently found growing beneath a bur oak tree (Quercus macrocarpa) in Manitoba. There is a loonie in the upper right corner of the photo for scale. As you can see, the fruiting body is quite large and colourful.

    I've had little success finding resources online to help identify this species. I'm not sure if it occurs in B.C. or not, but I thought I would post it here to see if anyone tell me its name (to genus or species) and effects it might have on the host tree. I assume it is a root pathogen of some sort.

    Thanks for your time.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 3, 2008
  2. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Meripilus giganteus?
     
  3. Spelunker

    Spelunker Member

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    Any chance it could be "Chicken in the woods" [Laetiporous sulphureus]?

    L. sulphureus is supposedly quite common according to 'Mushrooms of Ontario and Eastern Canada', and is most commonly found on oaks.
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Looks like Laetiporous sulphureus to me.
     
  5. Michael Kuo

    Michael Kuo Active Member

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    The position at the base of an oak tree, and the orange colors with what looks like a whitish pore surface (to judge from the margins), might mean it's Laetiporus cincinnatus, rather than L. sulphureus (which is yellower, grows from wood above the ground, and has a yellow pore surface).
    http://www.mushroomexpert.com/laetiporus_cincinnatus.html
    Best wishes, Michael
     
  6. Spelunker

    Spelunker Member

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    Thanks for the great explanation, Michael. Sounds good to me.
     
  7. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    either way? it's edible....if it's yellow underneath...ESPECIALLY good! the white undersided is also good? i've cooked it it pastas and egg dishes all this summer
     

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