Ultragrowth - What is it?

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by bob 2, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    We get a pretty steady infomercial here regarding a product called Ultragrowth.
    The manufactuer and a local garden show host keep endorsing it but never tells us what it does or what it contains.

    I have a bottle of the stuff and apply it every so often hoping to see some difference in my plants but so far I can't say I have.

    The website kind of mumbles through the actual benefits as well.

    Does anyone here have any information on this product or results that would make you want to go out and get more?

    Cheers
    Bob
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    According to your link Ultragrowth is a company and not a product. The company makes several different products, presumably with different formulations. Like you say, they apparently don't want to reveal what the active ingredients of these preparations are. Therefore, I would never use any of them. And you should stop applying the product you have already. Never put chemicals on the garden that you don't have a specific reason to use, such as a soil test report indicating a need for a soil nutrient that a particular product provides.
     
  3. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Probably a good call.
    When I originally purchased my bottle of ultragrowth it was the only product they were marketing and supposedly did all the wonderful things that now comes in three bottles. <g>
    I did some further investigating waiting for a reply here and notice that the High Frequency "water" they are selling seems to be an offshoot of homeopathic science which, at least to me, proposes some bizarre scientific concepts.
    As you point out, without any scientific data or the most remote clue what is in the bottle, it was probably foolhardy of me to use it in the first place.
    In my defense, the Radio show host has been a professional gardener here forever and has gained a great deal of respect from the local community.
    It's a shame he would endorse the product knowing what we know to be true.
    How do things like this pass through the regulatory bodies?

    Cheers
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2008
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  5. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Oh yeah, only thing missing here are the chicken bones and the weird hats! <g>
    It's hard to believe that this type of thinking still persists among the Sweet Maries and Oh Henry's ( Nut bars) <g>
    you realize of course, that I am referring to the Ultragrowth references and not those of Linda Chalker-Scott.

    My bad.

    Bob
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2008
  6. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

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    I didn't make it through all the details on that site. I thought the pic of Stan Thompson scaling the lattice was a little eerie.

    I got the feeling in the "plant food" section that they were describing the use of humate.

    I do use a bit of humate in many of my potting mixes
     
  7. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    One thing I admire about the U.S. requirement for labeling products is the requirement to list the ingredients on the label.
    I'm pretty sure this "concoction" probably contains Humate as you suggest but it would be helpful to know that prior to applying it and also helpful in accepting or dismissing some of the claims made for it by the manufacturers or it distributors.

    I appreciate the time and expertise here so freely given to bring me up to speed.

    Cheers
    Bob
     
  8. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Canada has pretty stringent requirements on any products that are sold with claims of benefits to plant growth. If you are not sure whether your product is registered, you can probably enquire via Canada Food Inspection Agency. The restrictions and regulations are covered by either the Canadian Environmental Protection Act or the Fertiliser Act.

    "Fertilizers Act:
    This Act covers agricultural fertilizers. Fertilizers and supplements may only be sold in or imported into Canada if they have been registered,packaged and labeled as prescribed and if they conform to the standards set out in the Act. The Governor in Council may make regulations respecting the registration, prescription of standards, packaging and labeling of fertilizer and supplements."

    Two types of products are regulated:
    "Fertilizer: any substance or mixture of substances, containing nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium or other plant food, manufactured, sold or represented for use as a plant nutrient; Supplement: any substance or mixture of substances, other than a fertilizer, that is manufactured, sold or represented for use in the improvement of the physical condition of soils or to aid plant growth or crop yields"

    The Act covers approved labelling of such products:
    Under the Fertilizers Act, a label is any legend, word, mark, symbol or design, applied or attached to, included in, belonging to or accompanying any fertilizer, supplement or package
    The label identifies the product and transfers information from seller to buyer (to make purchasing decision) what the product is, what it does, how to use it.

    I wonder if the product you used comes under "novel supplements". If so, the following applies:
    "Novel supplements are also required to be registered before they are imported into or sold in Canada. An application for authorization for release or for registration must include the information required to permit the safety and, as appropriate, efficacy of the supplement to be assessed, and its acceptability to be determined, in accordance with scientific methods and standards."

    Anyway, what I am trying to get at is my understanding that you can't sell a product with purported benefits to plant growth and specifically used for that purpose without listing the active ingredient/s. Or else, you can ask the manufacturer for those information - they are obliged to supply you with the info.
     
  9. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    So if I understand you correctly, when I go into a store in Canada, at the recommendation of a "horticulturist", that I must read the label completely and if in doubt go home, wait for Monday, call an ever busy Govt Line, get put one hold and then find out that my question is irrelevant as it has been asked of the wrong department?
    I think what is missing here is that the radio talk show and the "in caller"(AKA distributor) intimate that the product will make a huge difference to my gardening.
    Secondly when I go to the website and or to the retailer I have absolutely nothing to guide me.
    Thirdly, what is said on the radio is not printed on the label which to me is still making a statement of claim. That is not monitored by the Govt. agencies apparently and seems a loop hole.
    So my question is still:
    How do these products make it to market without reasonable scrutiny?
    In this case the product I am concerned with seems to be primarily Humeric Acid which has a questionable benefit for me as a home owner/gardener.

    Bob
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2008

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