Type of Cherry Tree

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Yo_Jo, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    Anyone know what type of cherry tree this is. This one had white flowers in the spring instead of the ornamental pink ones.

    Are the cherries edible?

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  2. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    It might be a seedling sweet cherry. Right next to a fence is a likely location for a bird to drop the seed. The fruit should be edible but may be thin and bitter.
     
  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Looks like Prunus Avium commonly known as Mazzard cherry.
    I would also remove the Ivy Hedra. Although it is not detrimental to the tree now, it may become a problem later by blocking light in the canopy, it can also hide problems in the bark etc.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    @Yo_Jo, both those answers were the same.

    The ivy can also strangle the tree. You can cut it all around the bottom of the tree and leave it to die, rather than damaging the bark further by pulling it off. Once it has died, you can more easily pull it (or some of it) off the tree.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Sweet cherry (Prunus avium) is very common in our region. There are three main ways it appears on a property:

    - The intentional planting of named orchard cultivars such as 'Bing'

    - The incidental planting of sweet cherry rootstocks when grafted Japanese cherry trees are purchased and planted; these stocks may in time supplant - even replace entirely - the Japanese cherry scions with their own top growth

    - The spontaneous sprouting of unselected sweet cherry seedlings, to the extent that the species is actually a weed in local woodlands. One that crosses with the native bitter cherry to produce the Puget cherry (P. x pugetensis)
     
  6. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    Thanks for the IDs.
    Years back before the new owners built the modern house, the lady that use to live there had many different unique plants and trees on the property. I remember every year the wisteria vine running up the deck had beautiful blueish violet blooms. I am guessing that that cherry was probably planted by birds.
    I mentioned the ivy to my neighbour and they like it climbing up the tree.
     
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  7. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    Wendy, I spoke to my neighbour this afternoon and they did try to cut the ivy at the bottom of the cherry tree 3 months ago when I first spoke to them about it.
    That ivy is not dying very fast. Do you think the ivy will wilt by winter time?
     
  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    As long as it is not receiving nutrients from the roots then yes it will. If done properly and they have not missed anywhere the leaves will start growing by now. It can take a while with Ivy.
     
  9. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here are recommendations for removal of tree-borne ivy, from Cougar Creek Streamkeepers (North Delta / Surrey BC): Tips for home and garden – Cougar Creek Streamkeepers
    • Cut all ivy stems on tree trunk at chest height.
    • Strip them down to ground and a meter or so away from base of tree, then cut again.
    • Even better, if ground infestation is not extensive, remove ivy entirely from ground, otherwise it'll be back up tree within a year or so.
    • Look carefully for any ivy stems that may have worked their way underneath tree bark. If these are missed in cutting process, not all ivy in tree will die back.
    • In hot dry weather, ivy should begin to wilt in just a couple of days; in cool wet weather, this can take a couple of weeks. If ivy leaves are still not noticeably wilted and losing colour after that, then look for ivy stems that may not have been (completely) cut.
    • Wait till ivy is thoroughly brown and dry before pulling it down from tree, so as to minimize damage to tree by suction-cup-like "holdfasts" that anchor ivy to bark.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  10. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I asked about the second step, why that doesn't damage the bark. I received a reply from Deborah Jones:
    It does damage the bark, but it's necessary in order to be sure that all stems are thoroughly disconnected from their ground-level source of water and soil nutrients. That's why the last step (or non-step) is only about minimizing damage to the tree, not eliminating that damage entirely (since that's impossible).

    Also: It's physically easier and offers a bit more "surgical" precision to pull the ivy stems away from the bark when you're working right at that level, than when you're pulling obliquely as hard as you can to try to tear down ivy that's way up the tree -- so that's a factor too.​
     
  11. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good evening Wendy, this is interesting what you have posted about the Ivy. Around where I live Ivy is being removed from street trees, but we are noticing that the leaves are still green some two months later and only starting to brown and die well into the third month. These have been cut 6ft from the ground and everything below professionally removed.
    It is a long process that can be avoided with observation before the problem occurs.
    Love the Streamkeepers link, 'brilliant volunteers'.
     
  12. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Deborah commented to me:
    I wonder if these are venerable British street trees :-) with convoluted bark and branching structure that has trapped pockets of organic debris and moisture up in the tree? Ivy could potentially send small roots into these small pockets, allowing the ivy to survive for a bit longer even after it's been cut off from its main roots in the ground. Or, if the ivy itself is "old growth" and the stems are very thick (8-10 cm diameter), there can be a lot of moisture in those stems to sustain the ivy above, for longer than usual. ​
     
  13. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    I think your friend Deborah maybe right, as the ivy on a very old Oak near me was removed but the stems were very thick indeed. I will try and get a photo this morning.
    There is also a movement in the UK trying to stop the removal of ivy as they say it is good for wildlife etc etc.
    Always two sides to an argument where ever you go !!!!
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I don't remember seeing any indication of climbing ivy rooting into tree surfaces, it's always had just the holdfasts when pulled loose.
     
  15. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Deborah refuses to join the forums, but has sent a reply to this:
    I don't mean that ivy roots into tree surfaces -- it doesn't! But in very old trees with fissured bark and/or complex branch joins, sometimes pockets of organic debris (--> soil) and water develop. Actual ivy roots (as opposed to holdfasts) can occasionally form there, as they can do when ivy crawls across the ground and a node re-roots somewhere along the way. ​
     
  16. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    This is the Oak tree near me that has had the Ivy professionally removed in 2019. It does have a TPO so can only be worked on by people with a permit.
    This tree struggled badly for about 10 years as the Ivy was completely in the canopy, but now it is gradually recovering. There is still some dead branches to be removed in the upper canopy. It took at least 3 months before the leaves turned brown and as you can see nothing else has been removed since then.
    A beautiful tree that was here when we moved to our new house 51 years ago.
    The pavement was constructed around it when the houses were built, showing that even then it was a tree worth keeping.
     

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