In The Garden: Two ornamental plants in NY

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by zhougong, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. zhougong

    zhougong Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Washington DC, USA
    Anyone help?
    First one, Amaranthaceae?

    The second one, tree with red leaves
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1-1.jpg
      1-1.jpg
      File size:
      119.7 KB
      Views:
      270
    • 1-2.jpg
      1-2.jpg
      File size:
      55 KB
      Views:
      257
    • 1-3.jpg
      1-3.jpg
      File size:
      100.8 KB
      Views:
      258
    • 2-1.jpg
      2-1.jpg
      File size:
      230.6 KB
      Views:
      289
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 19, 2012
  2. Maximo Dalmau

    Maximo Dalmau Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mallorca, Spain
    I have never seen the first one, so I am curious too, to find out what it is! =)

    The second one looks like Viburnum lucidum <Viburnum tinus lucidum> (100% if it has white cymose-corymb inflorescence)
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,188
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Can't be that, as that isn't hardy in NY. But may be some other Viburnum.
     
  4. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada

    It is hardy enough for Washington, DC zone 7 http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/. It can withstand temperatures down to - 15 C. It is a common practice to take a risk and "push the zone" a little.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,188
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    But New York gets temperatures down to -26°C (Central Park; from wikipedia). It isn't going to survive that!

    Also, the leaves on the plant here are a bit too narrow lanceolate for Viburnum tinus 'Lucidum' (compare e.g. here).
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,879
    Likes Received:
    621
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Compare with V. nudum.
     
  7. Maximo Dalmau

    Maximo Dalmau Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mallorca, Spain
    I have seen V. lucidum in Parks and Gardens in Neuss, Germany (South from Düsseldorf) that is Latitude 51º12' North, which is as far north as Quebec City, Newfoundland, etc. =)



    Lets not forget that a plant description is based on a type specimen and as it happens with us Humans, there are Tall, Small, Fat, Thin, etc. individuals. We might see some adaptations inside the same species. A great example, while studying at the University, was Pistacia lentiscus; Two specimens one in the coast the other in the mountain, hard to believe both are the same species. =)

    The first link shows a small shrub adapted to coastline conditions:
    https://twitter.com/MaximoDalmau/status/267179504416460802

    Second link shows a tree alike shrub:
    http://anthrome.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/img_2414.jpg


    To be 100% we need to see the inflorescence, leaves are not enough. =)
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012
  8. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    What you say, Michael, is both true and untrue. You put it a little differently than Wikipedia.

    Wikipedia says: "Extreme temperatures have ranged from −15 °F (−26°C), recorded on February 9, 1934 . . .".

    What Wikipedia also says is that normally: "New York City experiences a humid subtropical climate"
    and
    "The average temperature in January, the area's coldest month, is 32.1 °F (0.1°C). However, temperatures in winter could for a few days be as low as 10 °F (−12°C)" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City.

    In the light of this information Viburnum tinus lucidum is perfectly hardy in New York city.
     
  9. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California, United States
    interesting plant - thanks for posting
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,188
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    But a lot milder than New York in winter, because of the oceanic influence on the climate of NW Europe. Even milder still if you go to the Faroe Islands (60°N) ;-)

    But if it is a clonally-reproduced cultivar (as the references I found suggest), then it will be more consistent in leaf shape.

    I'd support Ron B on V. nudum, as that matches the leaf shape better and is a local native species in the area concerned, so rather more likely than an introduction from the Mediterranean.
     
  11. Chip

    Chip Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton
    The forb sort of reminds me of Dalea, but that seems like a really long inflorescence...
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,879
    Likes Received:
    621
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Laurustinus surviving New York for long is not likely, in addition to the winters being too cold it would not be expected to appreciate the Amazonian summers.
     
  13. Maximo Dalmau

    Maximo Dalmau Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mallorca, Spain
    Leaves represent 1/4 of the clasification process, which is not enough to identify a species. As I first said on this thread "it looks like" because it reminded of a plant I have worked with, but to be 100% certain flowers will be the key =)

    That is a good point! =) Keyword: Microclimates

    -----------------------

    I am not supporting either V. nudum, V. lucidum or even another species until a flower is shown. =)

    Here V. nudum flowers:
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Viburnum_nudum_flowers_8601.JPG

    To compare with V. lucidum flowers:
    http://www.burncoose.co.uk/site/plants.cfm?pl_id=4272&fromplants=pl_id=4244#

    and even more sorts of viburnum:
    http://www.burncoose.co.uk/site/plants.cfm?pl_id=4244
     
  14. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California, United States
  15. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

    Messages:
    785
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    Agree. Looks like Dalea after the seeds have been stripped off (or have fallen)
     

Share This Page