Tsuga mertensiana

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers) Photo Gallery' started by M. D. Vaden, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Beaverton, Oregon
    Tsuga mertensiana

    Mountain Hemlock

    Small younger tree near 4000 feet elevation - Rogue River National Forest at Blue Ledge Mine.

    Landscape use in Oregon near 200 feet elevation.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,707
    Likes Received:
    566
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    I've noticed a tendency for some wild collected plants to become more blue after living in the lowlands for awhile. Perhaps warmer, drier lowland conditions promote this.
     
  3. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Beaverton, Oregon
    In Oregon, quite a few up on the mountains that grew naturally, seem a bit on the greenish or yellowish side. It may be that the soil and conditions are a bit harsh on the mountains. Good possiblility of less nutrients. The growing season is definitely shorter on the mountains.

    Next summer I plan to drive up to Mt. Hood for a day or two. I'll pay closer attention to see what sort of spots the more blue color ones are growing in.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,707
    Likes Received:
    566
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Although it varies of course the dominant color is green in the mountains here, whereas in lowland cultivation blue dominates. What I have observed to account for this is individual specimens coming from the mountains mostly green and then becoming predominantly blue after growing down here for awhile.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,081
    Likes Received:
    320
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    I'd suspect that may be because the harsh environment in the mountains (perhaps particularly ice blasting in gales) wears off the blue wax on the needles.
     
  6. davelll

    davelll Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    juneau, alaska, usa
    Have any of you noticed a disease attacking the Mt Hemlocks in your areas? We are seeing tip die back, twisting of the last years growth and defoliation, in both wild sites and planted ones?
     
  7. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Beaverton, Oregon
    Didn't pay close attention last summer, but remember a few years ago where some tips browned following a flash of hot sunny weather during late spring. Not sure if there was any twisting, but maybe a teeny bit of curving.
     

Share This Page