Trees in pots

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Tcpip, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    I have some sucker trees I’ve planted to pots. Would it be best to plant them in the ground for winter? The plan would be to sell this tree eventually. Any tips and tricks so it won’t die in the pot but not get too rooted in the ground.
    I am located in cold Edmonton currently.
     
  2. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    You could either plant them in the ground or bury the pots in the soil for winter.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    In the ground yes, but not buried in their pots - they'll grow roots out through the drainage holes into the surrounding soil, and you won't be able to get them out again. So you're stuck with a tree constricted by a pot cutting into its trunk base as it grows, and that's a recipe for future catastrophic tree failure.
     
  5. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    I'll plant them in the ground for winter if they survive. They were sitting out in the sun and starting to wilt today. Thought they were wilting yesterday due to all the excess rain. They are now in the shade which should help that situation I believe. Thanks for all the help everyone!
     
  6. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    You got a one word answer in the hopes that you would add details to your situation. My bad.

    Firstly, you need to identify the trees, different strokes for different plants. You need to tell us how long they have been planted to know how fragile or established the root systems are. Suckers usually don't come with a stand-alone root system. Being connected to the roots of Mama and being severed means just that. It usually takes some expertise and protected conditions root "suckers".

    If they have a root system, then you can grow them on in pots in the ground thus: put them in a plastic or other non-breakable pot like a nursery pot. Sink the pot with some upper edge above the soil line. Leave it in the ground for two, but not three growing seasons. It will fill the pot with roots and some will escape through the drainage holes. Withdraw, prune the roots to remove large anchor roots in favor of tiny, hair-like feeder roots, and up-pot to a bigger size at the beginning of the third growing season and re-sink, ad infinitum, until it is the size you want. Periodically prune the top for economic and/or pleasant form.
     
  7. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    Ok thanks for the tips. I’m so new at all this but will give it a go but suspect I’ll kill these things.

    One is an Evans cherry and one is a ornamental non flowering snowcrab. They were both droopy yesterday and now I’m confused on the too much water vs too much heat or are they just in transplant shock.
     
  8. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Do they have roots?
     
  9. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    Yes they have roots. They look to be doing much better today. It's much cloudier today the leaves on the top have browned a little. The bottom still look green and healthy. They aren't drowning in water but the soil is damp from the rain yesterday. Was reading today that I should give them less sun for a week or two. Water When Plant Leaves Wilt - Garden Myths
    They always look much better in the morning after a nice cool night with no sun.
     
  10. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Protect them from extremes. Some east sun, no mid-day or west. No drought, but not soggy, either. Feed with a liquid fert at label levels every other week. When new buds show, go to full sun, as in sink the pot in full sun. Mulch over winter with leaves higher than the pot.
     
  11. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    ok thanks i'll update this thread if things turn out well or even not. Appreciate the help.
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The cherry is likely to be grafted, so that you are growing whatever rootstock it was grafted onto. Same with the flowering crabapple (presumably you meant "non-fruiting").
     
  13. Tcpip

    Tcpip New Member

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    Yes non fruiting :-)
     
  14. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    It is an excellent point, however, according to the info on the Net, Evans Cherry is most likely grown on its own root stock. Flowering Crabapples are usually (always?) grafted.
    Are you sure, Michael, they will grow so much roots during winter months in Edmonton hardiness zone 3, with temperatures that can drop to - 40 C? It is veeeery far from your zone 8/9!
    I would definitely leave drainage holes open. That would prevent the soil in the pot from beaming waterlogged if there happened to be a short period of milder, rainy weather during the winter months or early in spring.
    Please keep in mind OP's question: "Would it be best to plant them in the ground for winter?"
     

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