Tree

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by LandArch206, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. LandArch206

    LandArch206 Member

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    Location:
    Portland, OR USA
    Unknown deciduous tree growing in Portland. Oregon. Now 18" caliper, 40'+ ht.x30'+ spread. Strongly ridged bark, charcoal gray color. Looks almost like a walnut at first glance, but leaves are bi-pinnately compound, almost fern-like, serrated much like Rhus typhina 'Lanciolata' with a deep, strong V-shaped petiole. Leaves are 16"+ long, 20+ leaflets with a terminal leaflet. Leaflets dark green with prominent yellow-green center vein. Looks nothing at all like any pinnately compound-leaved North American trees that I've ever seen before. (Unfortunately I don't have any good plant keys for Asiatic tree species.) Any ideas?
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  2. treesrgood

    treesrgood Member

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Could it be a Mayan Drum Tree?
     
  3. LandArch206

    LandArch206 Member

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    The trunk of the Mayan Drum tree looks much too smooth, no ridges at all. My tree has strongly furrowed bark, much more similar to Juglans sp. or Robinia sp. or maybe Phellodendron sp. Of course the leaves of those are all wrong. Thanks for the prompt reply though.
     
  4. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Member of Meliaceae?
     
  5. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  6. LandArch206

    LandArch206 Member

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Thank you! That's exactly what it is. After your assist, found a great foliage picture at <http://www.cirrusimage.com/tree_cutleaf_black_walnut.htm> right down to the aphid "dew" on the leaflets. In all my visits through nurseries, this is a tree I've never before come across. Perhaps slow growing or difficult to propagate? As a varietal, maybe it never caught on in the nursery trade...
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Kind of a rare and special find.
     
  8. LandArch206

    LandArch206 Member

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Yes, a new tree for me as well. After finding out what it was, it was surprising to have found a specimen so large. Given the size, and assuming a growth rate somewhat similar to an oak, I'd say it was planted 35-40 years ago; somewhat close to the time they were apparently introduced to the nursery trade (from what I've read).
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Look at the shoots to determine how fast it has been growing in recent years. Could have developed more rapidly than you are thinking.
     
  10. LandArch206

    LandArch206 Member

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    Location:
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    Re: Tree Identification:

    Next time I go by, I'll check them out...thanks.
     

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