Tree with seeds in bag

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Andre, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. Andre

    Andre Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    What is it ?

    Thank you
     

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  2. Axel

    Axel Active Member

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    Reminds me of Staphylea.
     
  3. Andre

    Andre Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    OK thank you. I think you're right, it's Staphylea colchica known for his flowers with almond perfume

    The tree is also know as American bladdernut or false pistachio tree. The seed seems edible...
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    It's Staphylea, but I can't tell you which one.
     
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Oh, you all jumped in while I was typing. There are several species. I'm seeing the common name for S. colchica as Georgian Bladdernut, which might make more sense for the location. I'm seeing S. trifolia called American Bladdernut.

    I just watched a video in German, a language I don't know so I didn't understand it all, but I think one point made was that the seeds in S. colchica are not attached and you can hear them move around when you shake the pouch. I remember S. pinnata seeds as being attached. The video said that the inflorescence on pinnata is more compact.
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    There's a leaf with 5 leaflets at the bottom of the pic, so it's almost certainly Staphylea pinnata, which is also by far the most likely species at this location. The other species are usually just trifoliate (S. colchica can have 5 leaflets, but is rare in cultivation in W Europe).
     

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