Tree Peony

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Sarak, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. Sarak

    Sarak Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delta,BC, Canada
    I just bought a tree peony, I am not sure where to plan it, the fellow at the nursery said it will get to be about five feet tall. I live in Tsawwassen so sunhine is usually plentiful.

    Has anyone had luck with this beautiful plant? Do you fertilize it or should I just use bone meal?
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,082
    Likes Received:
    321
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Some shade early in the morning is often considered a good thing, so that it does not get sunshine direct onto foliage when there is a late frost.

    Shouldn't need any fertiliser at all, unless a soil test shows a marked deficiency. This one has never had any.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,499
    Likes Received:
    215
    Location:
    sw USA
    There are tree peonies at the front entrance to the UBC Botanical Garden. They bloom beautifully each year. Wonderful fragrance!
     
  4. Sarak

    Sarak Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delta,BC, Canada
    That is great news I will check them out, so it is not too early to plant my tree peony then.
     
  5. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    62
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Very good drainage and air circulation is important. If it's grafted onto a herbaceous root , it can be planted with only 1 or 2 of the tree peony buds or branches above ground to encourage growing it's own roots. Assuming the plant is a 1 or 2 year old graft.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,715
    Likes Received:
    567
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    The P. suffruticosa types (such as one shown) are prone to frost injury of the new growth. This can be nasty. I had a newish one (supposed to be a wonderful deep purple) not yet seen in bloom bud up last year and then get blasted by frost, killing all of the upper part of the top. This year's flowerless shoots are coming from near the base (but above the graft).
     
  7. smivies

    smivies Active Member

    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Hi Ron....At what point in P. suffruticosa's bud break does the foliage become sensitive to frost? Mine has usually broken the bud by this time (this year being no exception) and the shoots develop/mature very slowly but seem to survive our many frosts/freezes that we get between now and early May. It's supposed to be -6ºC here this weekend (which is not unusual) but all this talk of frost sensitivity has me worried. Ditto for Fritillaria persica, it's 1-1/2" tall & supposed to be frost sensitive?

    Simon
     
  8. maggiec

    maggiec Active Member

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    new westminster, BC
    Interesting story. My MIL decided at the last minute that she wanted me to transplant the peony I had given her the year before (which had one bloom the first year). It was in Dec and there was more than a foot of snow on the ground. She was moving into a townhouse so I transplanted into a large pot, thinking it was most likely done for. Anyway, it came back beautifully this spring, and has 6 fat buds on it.

    I also transplanted a very large specimen from my sister's house when she moved, and it handled the move very well, blooming that spring. I've heard they're picky about being moved, but I've found them to be fairly tough.

    I have a beautiful 8 yr old tree out front that gives me more than 50 blooms. I say definitely give this plant a fair amount of room as it gets quite wide. That one is about 5-6' wide and the huge heavy blooms means the stems require staking.
     
  9. Sarak

    Sarak Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delta,BC, Canada
    Thank youso much for taking the time to reply to my question. It seems yo have had great luck , do you use any fertislizer?

    Regards,
    Sara k
     
  10. maggiec

    maggiec Active Member

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    new westminster, BC
    I've found tree peonies to be so easy to care for. Nothing special other than digging it a nice hole in a sunny location. They require very little pruning - just snipping off the occasional bit of dead growth. I haven't fertilized other than adding the odd bit of compost. I have 4 trees and found that they are a bit slow to take off the 1st or 2nd year, and then they really start to have good growth/bloom.
     
  11. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baltimore, Md.
    Only thing I can add this is they do not like transplanting.
     

Share This Page