Tree Mold????

Discussion in 'Garden Pest Management and Identification' started by sungodess134, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. sungodess134

    sungodess134 Active Member

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    Port St. Lucie, FL
    Hi, We have never been sure what type of tree this is, it is very unusual but pretty. It was split in half a few years back by a series of hurricanes, but recovered nicely. It grows shoots up out of the ground and creates new trees, evidenced by all the new trees sprouting up in that hard to reach place between my fence and my neighbors.
    The problem is over this past summer I noticed a black mold??? growing on it. It is affecting some of the new sprouts growing up between the fence. The only thing is we have a pretty bush that grows around the base of the tree, (sorry can't think of the name of this either both were established when we moved in) and there is no mold??? or affect from what's happening with the tree to the bush. Here are some pictures, can take more if needed, can anyone help me? I am at a loss as to what to do. Removal of the tree is last resort. Thanks.
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sooty mould, growing on honeydew ("aphid poop"). it means your tree has an infestation of aphids or scale insects.
     
  3. sungodess134

    sungodess134 Active Member

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    so what should I do?
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

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    It looks like a pretty big tree, so the simple remedies aren't going to work all that well.

    If it's scale, you'll find the oval bumps underneath the leaves, sometimes on green stems and petioles. Some scale are whitish, some brown, some inbetween. The immature scale will move about, finding a spot to eventually fasten down on where it can feast on the tender growth, sucking fluids and expelling honeydew that feeds the sooty mold. Scale you can sometimes control with a dormant oil spray.

    Aphids are somewhat easier to control. Small insects that you'll see move a bit, clustering in leaf axils, on new growth, sometimes on the undersides of leaves, too. Lots of insecticides work on them, also horticulture soap spray, garlic or red pepper spray, and dormant oil.

    Both can be dislodged with a forceful spray of water when they are young, and aphids continue to be affected by that as they mature. Scale not at all, once they have attached firmly.

    Once you control them, you control the sooty mold.
     

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