Tree ID - ash and elm

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lettuce, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. lettuce

    lettuce Active Member

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    I've been having trouble with these.

    1) I've tried to put up as many pics--- first 5 are this Ash which I think is Fraxinus angustifolia because of the brown buds, but leaves are more like F.excelsior. Here's a photo of it with 15 leaflets, but there are also branches carrying 13 leaflets.

    As you can see, it grows on a meadow and there are few more of such specimens some distance apart (dont know how many exactly). Other younger trees grow nearby (background of main photo).
    I dont really know if these older trees were planted.

    Photo of leaf underside is a bit blurry. It has a small tuft of orange/brown hair at the bottom on the sides of main rib, otherwise glabrous (F.angustifolia ssp.oxycarpa?)


    2) Other photos, except the last one - Ulmus procera? These grow near roadsides where plough fields are.


    3) Last photo - Another elm found in a forest, not sure if same species as above?


    Any ideas? .... thanks
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The ash is an odd one; 15 leaflets is rare in any ash. Around here, native F. excelsior has 11 or 13 leaflets (about equal abundance; also 9, rarely), but is otherwise very similar in leaflet shape. The F. angustifolia occasionally planted here (all of the cultivar 'Raywood') have 7 or 9 leaflets, very much narrower (pic below). The bud colour matches F. angustifolia; even this early in the summer, F. excelsior has conspicuously black buds.
     

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  3. lettuce

    lettuce Active Member

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    I'm still open to suggestions. If anyone needs more photos, certain details, I can make them any time. The trees are not far from my place.
    In the meantime I'll try to ask around whether these trees were planted or not.

    About that elm... I've been doing some more extensive research and U.minor seem like a good guess. Primarily because the leaf base of longer side makes a 90° into the petiole, whereas U.procera has its longer side rounded (also, twigs persistently pubescent).
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Are there any seeds on the ash? Looked up; unlike the leaves, F. angustifolia has shorter, broader seedwings than F. excelsior.

    Ulmus minor does seem likely, it is probably the most widespread elm in Europe, and the thick bark yours has is a frequent character of it.
     

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