Tree dying after roots cut

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by froghog1031, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. froghog1031

    froghog1031 New Member

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    Location:
    Visalia, usa
    I have I think a white birch tree.
    I was repairing a sprinkler and I had to cut two small roots that were preventing me from repairing the sprinkler....
    Now it appears my tree in dying or in shock.
    Is there anything I can do to save my tree?
     
  2. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    Are you watering it well? Birches love water.

    You could also remove some foliage to compensate for the severed roots
     
  3. Ryan K

    Ryan K Member

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    Location:
    Burnaby, BC
    What is the size of the tree, and size of the root you cut?
     
  4. David Payne Terra Nova

    David Payne Terra Nova Active Member

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    Location:
    Port Coquitlam, B.C. Canada
    Most likely the dieback is only a coincidence. You probably have a "Bronze Birch Borer" or some-thing similar.

    We have an epidemic of this beetle on the lower mainland around Vancouver B.C.

    Their entrance holes are capital D shaped. Typically the top of the Birch will die back, as if there was serious root damage. It will snap off in the wind. The BBB tunnels through the trees cambium and cuts off the food and water supply to the top of the tree.

    Do some research on my suggestion and see if this is the case. We have no pesticides registered to use where I am, but your extention office or a nursery or a certified arborist should be able to assist you with control measures. I believe Lindane was once used for this type of insect damage.

    You can lessen the damage by keeping your trees well irrigated during times of drought and stress. Apparently this causes more sap and liquid movement in the layers of tree bark. They don't like to tunnel in this.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Reduction of top reduces ability to grow new roots, and vice versa.
     
  6. Scottmcm

    Scottmcm New Member

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    Location:
    Trenton, MI
    I think you injured your tree :) You should treat it as if it was injured and probably has acquired a tree disease that is common with that type of tree from the injury. Betting you may have caused mold, fungus, or as the previous post suggests...it maybe a parasite of some type. I would research that tree and its common disease problems and treat accordingly (based on inspection). Moving trees also causes similar stress. Many people would suggest trimming back to stimulate root growth, however, never trim too much because the roots are dependent on production of sugar at the leaves and only benefit due to the subsequent advantageous shoot growth and hormone movement. You definitely need to treat the problem, its probably not water.
     

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