transplant old rose

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by atherk, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. atherk

    atherk Member

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    I transplanted a old rose about 2 weeks ago ,it looks like its not goinging to survive .Is there any thing I can do to save it
     
  2. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

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    Was there by any chance an old rose planted in the same spot before?

    Never plant roses in an old rose planting hole.

    I would plant your rose in a pot so you can keep an eye on it. Use new compost, then feed it.
     
  3. atherk

    atherk Member

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    I took it out frm my front lawn as i was renovating and planted it in back yard
     
  4. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Can you show a picture of it and can you describe what you mean, when you say 'it looks like it's not going to survive'? Need more information...

    Also, hope you enjoy UBC Gardening Forum, Atherk!

    : )
     
  5. atherk

    atherk Member

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    sory i have n camera ,most of the leaves are dry stems are still green and few of the leaves are still green ,but every day there are more dry leaves and no new leaves are comming
     
  6. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    it's not really the best time to move roses...as long as you got most of the rootball, then it should recover - albeit, probably won't look all that robust until sometime next summer (or even the next).

    did you cut it back any before moving it?? if not, i'd prune it now to reduce the stress of being moved. take at least 1/3 of it off. you can even take 1/2 of it off...the less leaves it has to worry about feeding, then the more focus can be put on re-estabishing the roots.

    i'd also get some root stimulant concentrate and mix it up (as per package directions) and apply it per directions for a couple weeks and then do applications every couple weeks there after until fall sets in.

    mulch it very well for winter - those roots will be a bit more susceptible to damage since there will be a lot of newer growth now.

    it should be fine if it was in good shape before the move. it's just in shock at the moment and needs time to recover.

    been there, done that (and i made the additional mistake of doing it on a very hot AND sunny day). took two years for it to fully recover...it did, though, and is still doing well 4 years later.
     
  7. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

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    answered
     
  8. atherk

    atherk Member

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    thanks
     
  9. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Yup, I transplanted one years ago too, and I had to shade it from the sun, because it was not going to make it. I had umbrellas everywhere!

    Roses are pretty hardy, and will usually spring back, even after a tantrum. Here is some information I found, that you may also find useful...

    Good luck!

     

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