Rhododendrons: transplant help

Discussion in 'Ericaceae (rhododendrons, arbutus, etc.)' started by Hermsmeier22, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. Hermsmeier22

    Hermsmeier22 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Culpeper, VA, USA
    I found some volunteers from re-rooted branches when pruning a friends rhodo and thought I might as well try to transplant them. I have root pruned and top pruned them and planted them in part shade. Some were vigorous water sprouts and have been pruned back to dormant buds on the main stock. Does anyone have any suggestions for what else I can do to help these rhodos survive.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,510
    Likes Received:
    451
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Keep them mulched and moist. For future reference note that root pruning is done in order to produce a compact ball enabling transplanting some months later, and that as of some years ago at least research into this practice had produced indications that it does not necessarily confer significant advantages. The roots are cut, then you wait for the more compact root system to develop before lifting the plants. Most growth of new roots in response to cutting of the roots would be expected to occur in spring on hardy trees and shrubs. The greatest total volume of root enlargement occurs in fall, after the overwintering buds are set on the ends of the stems. But this consists of elongation of existing, undamaged roots. Root growth is comparatively minimal during summer.

    Top pruning at planting time is of no assistance to trees and shrubs and can even have a detrimental effect. The leaves and stems support new growth of roots. Tops of transplants should only be reduced when impossibly large, sparse or floppy.
     
  3. Hermsmeier22

    Hermsmeier22 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Culpeper, VA, USA
    thanks for the timing tips.
     

Share This Page