To Move or not to Move

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by kiye, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. kiye

    kiye Member

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    IMGP8621.jpg



    Hi

    I am completely reinveting this garden area. I already cut out all of the awful black plastic lining, have dug out the soil to be replaced, replaced the rock border and have begun planting flowers.

    So, my question is..... should I move this palm from this location. This is the front entry to the house. It is west facing and recieves very little shade and a lot of direct sun. The leaves seem to get beaten by the harsh elements. I am always clipping dead and torn, discolored leaves off.

    There is another palm that I think is the same type in the back yard that it about 20 feet tall. If this gets that tall it will be a little crazy. I do not think that it is growing fast. I have been told that this palm has been in this sopt for atleast 6 years! If I leave it should I feed it something special?




    So, should I try and move it or leave it. If I do move it how? and where?

    Thanks
    Kiye
     
  2. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Looks like Livisona chinensis. In time this will block your enterance when it grows to it's full potential.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  3. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    if it were over to the left a bit and in front of that wall, i'd say leave it - even if it will get pretty large. where it is now, as it grows, it's going to block the entryway and it's going to be a detriment rather than an improvement to the street view as well as for curb appeal. so, i'd opt to move it - either off to the side a bit to act as a 'balancer' or to a completely different location. from what you're saying it does sound like the location (sun level) isn't really quite right anyway, so it'll probably do better elsewhere.

    i'd also keep whatever is directly in front of the porchette low - nothing higher than 2 feet or so...again, that's so the entry way can be seen and enjoyed (nice door and the bench is nice). i WOULD put a couple of nice tall planters on the porch and have a variety of flowers and vines in them. or, you could put shorter planters in and have something that grows tall - either philodendrons or other vines on trellises or maybe a brugmansia, plumeria or something along that line.
     
  4. kiye

    kiye Member

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    Thanks!
    I think that you are both right. I really want to move it more and more the more I work on the area. I am afraid that it will end up as tall as the one in the back yard. The leaves are pretty but it has very sharp spikes.

    I have some ideas of things to put there. I have quite a few Madagascar Dragon Trees in the side yard that are very happy. I may move a few of those.

    I am a little afraid of the move. I wonder where it would be happier. More shade? The soil here is very sandy. I know alamost nothing about palms...and moving them. Any advice about that?

    I dug around it and can get my shovel under the stup to move it a bit back and forth. I need to decide where I will put it before I really pull it out though.
    eeek
     
  5. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    can you post some more pics of the various spots you're thinking of putting it?? would help us to help you :)
     
  6. kiye

    kiye Member

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    I have attached a few pictures.
    The first is of the same type of palm in the back yard where it gets shade for about half of the day. IMGP8660.jpg IMGP8657.jpg
    There is a spot next to the fence in the front IMGP8655.jpg
    thhere is a huge section of yard that refuses to grow grass. Maybe I should plant things here? front1.jpg IMGP8656.jpg
    It would be great to have it in a pot for a while and think on it but I am sure that it would need a HUGE pot.
    I have some space along the back fence where I was thinking of planting some rubber trees that I have rooted from the neightbors clippings. I could put it there.
    I may just decide to give it to the neighbors and see what they do with it.
     
  7. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    ahh, the palm in the back is doing much, much better!! so, that spot in front is definitely too sunny.

    the spot by the fence, at the end of the hedge...does that spot have similar shady condtions like where the palm in the back yard is? if so, i'd move the small palm there. just off the corner of the house and, as it grows, it'll be a nice visual interest.

    the spot where the grass doesn't grow well - too sunny (which also means dry)?? if so, you could put in some stonecrop sedum. lots of varieties which range in leaf color from light greens to dark greens and there are also reds to purples, too. most flower colors are yellows and pinks. they get about 2 -2 1/2 feet tall and will spread. they don't spread all the fast up here and you can always assist by topping off and planting the pieces as they root really easy.

    up here, they die back for winter. not sure if they'd do that there. they bloom late summer here - would probably be a different time there and you might be able to deadhead and have another showing.

    there are lots of other types of sedums, too, to choose from.

    you can also plant hens & chicks. they'll spread out nicely and fill that area in very well. again, many different varieties. some have reddish or purple variegation and some are solid greens. some lighter greens and some darker. some even have webbing which looks really nice (because it's so different).
     
  8. kiye

    kiye Member

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    The spot next to the fence is my best bet I think. I am also considering moving this palm to the same spot. It also has to be moved.
    IMGP8658.jpg

    The purple plants in the background love it here. I think I may put some of those in the front where the other palm is going to be moved from.

    I love the chicks and hens. I think that I am already growing some of the oher flowering plants that you mentioned and they are doing well. Great suggestions. Thanks :)
     
  9. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    the purple plant looks like a cordyline (ti plant) and they normally need some amount of shade, so, putting that out front, in full western sunlight, wouldn't be a good idea.

    the stonecrop sedums are one of my favs - they grow just about anywhere and require very little care to do so.
     
  10. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Can I also warn against planting rubber trees out. Have a friend who is deeply regreting having done this a few years ago. Florida seems like a great place for them to go beserk.

    "Trees planted near buildings need to be chosen carefully. A beautiful tree like a fig, if planted in a bed that is too narrow to accommodate its massive roots, will ultimately lift up any pathways and damage the foundations of any nearby wall in its efforts to find room to grow. Both ornamental figs and rubber trees have large anchoring roots and needs to be given plenty of room to grow."
    http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1135201.htm

    http://www.infolink.com.au/c/Stream...s-clears-drains-blocked-by-tree-roots-n748273

    Liz
     
  11. kiye

    kiye Member

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    Liz,
    Oh yea. I definitely won't plant the rubber tree near the house. they are going in the back yard by the fence. I think that they are really pretty but I am afraid of them taking over big time.

    Joclyn,
    I think that you are right, the purple ones are cordyline. They seem to like the sun here. I have one in a pot that has been out front for about 6months. Its kinda my tester.
    We will see how it all lookes when the area is cleaned up.

    I got 1 of the 2 palms out yesterday. It was pretty tough. But I did it!
    I am going for the second one today.

    I did buy another stonecrop yesterday. Purple flowers :)

    Thanks
     
  12. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Cordyline belong to my climate and definatly like sun, heat and dryish conditions.
    Re Rubber tree if you do plant by fence make sure it will not cause problems for neighbour. This is where my friend ran into trouble
    Liz
     
  13. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    kiye, which stonecrop?? i didn't know any have purple flowers...and, if there is one, it MUST be planted in my garden!!! LOL
     
  14. kiye

    kiye Member

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    Oh I am sorry. I was completely mistaken. I thought that I had found what you were talking about "stonecrop" but this is what I actually got. The flowers look so simialr in the photos.
    "Pentas Lancelata"

    http://www.greenbeampro.com/content/view/1458/205/

    I am going to plant these in the front planter. I also have had a white one that has bloomed pretty steadily since october.

    Gardening is very strange here in florida. Many annuals are perannials and grow in to bushes. Kinda scarry and fun at the same time.

    Sorry for the mistake of ID.

    Thanks
     
  15. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    oh, isn't that funny!!!! i was just looking at those on friday!! up here, they'd be annuals (so i didn't get it) - where you are, they'll basically grow all year without stopping (or maybe with a little bit of dormancy during the hottest times and then again during the coldest times).

    annual/perennial is based on heat/cold temps and what the requirements are for the particular plant.

    some plants need warmer temps to survive/thrive and some plants actually need the cold to thrive properly. it's just a matter of adjusting to what kind of plants will do best in the conditions you have there in florida.
     

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