To be Identified: Possible Pest!

Discussion in 'Garden Pest Management and Identification' started by SvenLittkowski, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

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    Please have a look at the attached photo.

    I saw today at the bottom of my bamboo some things, which I am suspecting to be, maybe, some sort of pests. I grow the bamboo at my home.

    Is this a pest, and if, what type of pest, and what damage might these little critters do, and most of all - how to get best rid of them (also, what's attracting them to my bamboo)?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Not a bamboo (woody grass), but rather Dracaena sanderiana. This has been marketed as lucky bamboo. Probably the bumps are aerial root initials, an natural part of the plant.
     
  3. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

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    Thanks for the answer! No pest, really just areal roots or something like that? Would be fine. In fact, if these are the initials of aerial roots (I used some root hormons in the past), then how to let them grow as additional roots? I would like that very much, because the plant comes off a stem to which it seems to have been attached and grown together. But the connection is relatively thin, so having additional (air) roots would further stabilize the plant, and also grant more access to the nutrition resources in the soil to the plant.
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

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    They probably won't grow as aerial roots that go down to the soil to anchor the plant, if that's what you are thinking.

    Most often, they'll just make little overtures as you are seeing and then stop. With age, they might shrivel a bit, but that could be years from now. If you were to wrap a bit of moist moss around it, the root nubbin would grow into it. If you were to cut it off just below the root bits and root in water or soil, it would do so very easily.

    Warm moist tropical air encouraged these tiny growths. They are not signs of disease or damage, but rather very healthy.

    Oh, if for some reason you put a plank of rough bark next to it, kept it damp, the root might grow onto the bark, too. Not the usual way to grow dracaena, though.
     
  5. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

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    Thanks! Great answers! Full of suggestions, and inspirations! I start right away!
     

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