Timelapse Philodendron

Discussion in 'Botany Photo of the Day Submissions' started by ChrisR, May 16, 2008.

  1. ChrisR

    ChrisR Active Member

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    Here is a time lapse set of photographs of my Philodendron Bipinnatifidum. The photographs were taken one hour apart beginning early afternoon over a period of 8 hours. The Spadix moves forward and then starts to heat up. I measured it reaching a temperature of 43 degree centigrade, some 20 degree centigrade hotter than room temperature which was 23 centigrade.

    The Spadix also emitted a lovely peppery warm musk like scent for about two hours. If I could bottle that I'd be very happy! :)
     

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    Last edited: May 16, 2008
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Fascinating!
     
  3. natureman

    natureman Active Member

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    Very cool!
     
  4. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    If you go to this link you can view a visual timelapse of the event discussed in this thread:

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=38988&highlight=heat



    The perfume is known to science as a pheromone. It is produced at female anthesis to attract the appropriate male insect pollinator to cause pollination. Often, only a single species of male insect is involved but he also brings along his mate. That male insect can detect a single molecule of the pheromone from 1 mile away since it is thought the pheromone smells like the female of his species who is ready to reproduce.

    This may interest you:

    http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Grow or Growing Philodendrons.html
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2008
  5. ChrisR

    ChrisR Active Member

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    One insect only? Crikey, that's limiting itself! Won't any insect pollinate it just by walking up & down it? Lovely website by the way, many thanks for the link : )
     
  6. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    wonderful pics, thank you!
     
  7. ChrisR

    ChrisR Active Member

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    Thanks Joclyn. I had a lot of fun doing them! : )
     
  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Chris, may I use one (or a few) of your other photographs from the original thread to accompany this? I've never done a time-lapse sort of thing with BPotD before, so I'd prefer to "lead" with a typical static photograph, then include the timelapse in the entry.
     
  9. ChrisR

    ChrisR Active Member

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    Daniel, many thanks for asking. I'd be both delighted & honoured! : )
    Best wishes,

    Chris

    <edit> Daniel, If you'd like higher resolution images than those I posted please let me know.
     
  10. Eric in SF

    Eric in SF Member

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    Fascinating!

    How did you measure the temperature?
     
  11. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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  12. ChrisR

    ChrisR Active Member

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    Hi Eric, sorry I only clocked your post just now. I used an infra red thermometer. You point it at the object you want to know the temperature of, pull the trigger and the reading appears on a LCD display on the rear of the unit. I originally bought it to measure the cylinder head temperature of a motorcycle engine. See photos.
     

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