Thermogenesis

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by ThomasR, Aug 3, 2020.

  1. ThomasR

    ThomasR New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Quebec
    Hello everyone, I'm looking into heat producing plants and I can't seem to find a book dedicated to the subject, or at least an article that goes into the details of using thermogenesis to help regulate temperature in greenhouses. I did try searching the forum before posting this, but found nothing. If anyone can help, that'd be really great. Thanks!
     
  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

    Messages:
    5,404
    Likes Received:
    3,298
    Location:
    Hampshire England Zone 8b UK
    @ThomasR, good afternoon and welcome to the forums. I hope you will find the answers to your question.
    If you would like to add photos of your greenhouse and plants I have added this link to give instruction on how to do this if that is useful.
    Attach photos and files from Mobile Device
     
    ThomasR likes this.
  3. ThomasR

    ThomasR New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Quebec
    Thank you very much!
     
  4. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    Marysville, WA USA
    Hi Thomas. I don't think you'll find that kind of info. I believe it would be impractical to use thermogenesis to assist in greenhouse heating for several reasons. First, it's just not enough heat to make much difference, you would need the whole greenhouse dedicated to the thermogenic plants even to make a tiny dent in the greenhouse temperature. Then also they don't produce the heat on a long-term basis, usually only during the very short peak time for attracting pollinators. Then there is also the stank factor, since this is usually associated with plants whose flowers mimic the smell of feces or a dead corpse to attract fly pollinators. Then also is the difficulty factor, since most of these type of plants are notoriously difficult raise in a greenhouse.

    Is this for a school research project? There sure are a lot of cool aspects surrounding thermogenic plants that would make an interesting article.
     
    Daniel Mosquin likes this.
  5. ThomasR

    ThomasR New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Quebec
    Thanks a lot for the info! It's for a home project, we were looking for different ways to save on energy. At least now we know!
     
    Daniel Mosquin likes this.
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    9,981
    Likes Received:
    338
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Have you looked at the heat generated from organic material decay?
     
  7. scilover

    scilover Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Malaysia
    I just knew that plants also can produce heat. It is rare in plants, but it does occur in some species of angiosperm. The heat is generated via plant.
     
  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

    Messages:
    5,404
    Likes Received:
    3,298
    Location:
    Hampshire England Zone 8b UK
    Yes some plants do give off a little heat, but not enough to warm a greenhouse. The old way of composting manure to heat greenhouses for exotic fruits was a successful way many years ago.
     
  9. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    Marysville, WA USA
    Malaysia, scilover? Wow, you live very close to some of my very favorite thermogenic plants, Amorphophallus titanum & all of the Rafflesia! Do you grow any heat-producing plants yourself? I don't think we have any native to our area here. Does anyone know if the Eastern skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus, ever gets all the way over here the Pacific Northwest?
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    9,981
    Likes Received:
    338
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    I can't find a scientific paper that either proves / disproves that Lysichiton americanus is thermogenic, though I am certainly seeing claims on both sides. The claim that Lysichiton isn't thermogenic on the two Wikipedia pages for Lysichiton and thermogenesis uses a reference that says nothing of the sort.
     
  11. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    Marysville, WA USA
    Interesting point, Daniel! I did find a serious discussion on the subject in the Handbook of Flowering Volume VI by Abraham H. Halevy, 2019, page 421. It says that Lysichiton shows multiple pathways specifically for thermogenicity, but the actual thermogenesis itself is absent in all stages of development, even though its close relatives have it.
     
  12. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    9,981
    Likes Received:
    338
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Perfect, that'll do to convince me. That is strange, though, isn't it?
     

Share This Page