Appreciation: "the pandemic hit and suddenly interest in the grow kits was booming"

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Mar 17, 2021.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    An article in The Guardian today. Every cloud has a silver lining. Almost no contrails to deface the clear blue sky (here in northern New Mexico at least), working from home (good for us introverts), and now mushrooms grown at home:

    Why mushrooms are the new houseplant everybody's growing
     
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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Great article @allelopath, I wonder when all the lockdowns are over and this pandemic is consigned to the history books ( hopefully), whether people will continue to grow these amazing mushrooms.
     
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  3. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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  5. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Agreed. I've run into people out in the forest who were carrying B. edulis and Leccium spp. and they thought they were all the former.
     
  6. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Fortunately neither are poisonous, although the stalks of the Leccium spp are now thought to be.
    I think it's going to be a case of education on this topic. Isn't it funny though how the human race has lost the ability and knowledge of what to to eat and what not.

    Enjoyed your postings btw.
     
  7. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    In support of your Leccium thought, in the L. insigne entry in Mushrooms of Colorado and the Southern Rocky Mountains (Evenson) says:

    The Rocky Mountain Poison Center receives occasional reports of serious gastric problems, some requiring hospitalization, from eating moderate amounts of so-called orange caps, usually well cooked, found under aspen in various part of Colorado

    I have eaten L. insigne and L. fibrillosum with no effects. The ones I find are not under aspen, but rather under spruce. I don't eat them though because of aesthetics. They turn a dirty black when cooked. The only mushroom that I've found under aspen and consumed is F. straminae. It is a rare and delightful find here in the southern Rockies.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
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  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning @allelopath, this post by you I hope is read by many forum members, as it is very pertinent with foraging on the increase.
     

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