The leaf-curl resistant Nanaimo Peach

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Al Chomica, Mar 1, 2021.

  1. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Does anyone in this group know the story behind the leaf-curl resistant Nanaimo Peach that is now in the USA and not in Nanaimo? I can find no leads to its history and plan to bring them back to Canada.

    A friend in Washington just bought one from One Green World but apparently they are not available in Canada for some reason. I see they are both Trademarked and have a copyright but if they are resistant to leaf-curl they should probably be propagated here in the Canadian PNW...
     
  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    Any clues in this old thread?
    Peaches on Vancouver island

    I read the blog of the man growing Nanaimo Peach on Vashon Island WA State — again it’s that one green world nursery in Oregon

    Have you called Dinters just south of Duncan BC?

    What about the research station in Saanich - is it still there? Maybe they have info

    Maybe the Ag Canada research stn in Summerland BC has info
     
  3. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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  4. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Thanks for a couple good leads. Yes, I talked to Bernie last week and all he knows is that it is now patented and unavailable in Canada. I talked to Bob Duncan and I also talked to the owner of Tallclover farms who was about to prune his tree and was going to send me the scions but when he checked with Customs the phytosanitation restrictions prevent it from coming home. He says he will send me pits in August and mentioned they do grow true.
    Hadn't heard of the Saanich station and I'll snoop around the Summerland office too. Besides yearning for a LCR peach to grow and propagate I am trying to unravel the history behind this plant and hope to write an article about it. Update: I tried calling the Saanich ag dept but could not locate any site information. I also called Summerland but one just gets a recording so they are both dead ends. I suppose calling One Green World might be a good place to start...
     
  5. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    Is there a way to figure out what person / company patented it?

    Maybe the Nanaimo BC museum archives had some info

    Then again - I am assuming that because it’s called “Nanaimo” that it is from Nanaimo BC

    Maybe someone had a sentimentality toward Nanaimo ... a fascinating puzzle indeed!
     
  6. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    $80-million research facility to rise at Plant Health Centre in North Saanich

    It appears that this is the current incarnation of the old research stn — did it get rebuilt ? I don’t know


    However - it mentions tree fruit in the article - maybe someone knows something
    ————
    Unfortunately anyone I used to know at Summerland BC research stn is long gone ...

    Maybe someone at OSU in Corvallis OR has insight (OSU being the ag school)
     
  7. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    More info found by googling around - in the latter decades before 2000 ... there appears to be a Dr Hugh Daubney who was born Nanaimo 1931

    He was a research scientist at Agassiz BC research stn ... it is still there

    Anyway - it seems he “invented” a strawberry named “Nanaimo” while at the research station circa 1993

    So I wonder if he also came up w the mystery peach

    There is lots of info about the Nanaimo strawberry in academic and USDA libraries it seems — so maybe you’ll find the mystery peach too

    Hère are just few of references for the strawberry and Agassiz

    Publication : USDA ARS

    https://specialcollections.nal.usda.gov/speccoll/collectionsguide/darrow/Darrow_TheStrawberry.pdf

    Agassiz Research and Development Centre - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

    Information archivée dans le Web | Information Archived on the Web

    https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/1718/PDF/2000/Hokanson.pdf
     

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  8. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Good sleuthing and a fair assumption on the name. I'll dig into these links later when I am done soilsmithing. Interesting about the strawberry as this is going to be the year of the Strawberry in our gardens. Last year we dabbled with several varieties and this year my lineup is, in order of preference, Charlotte from France, Framberry from the UK, British Sovereign, that we have been growing since the 60's, Pineberry, Aloha Berry, Albion although it is not very sweet or tasty, and if those pesky seeds would ever sprout I would have black and yellow strawbs from Austria...
     
  9. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    What a selection!

    You’ll enjoy a chart in one of those reports — it shows which were the favoured varieties back a couple of decades ago in BC /WA /OR

    I did not realize “totem” is a BC invention

    PS — I have seen the Dr Nanaimo Scientist name spelled a couple of diff ways online so look for both
    Daubney
    Daubeny
     

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  10. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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  11. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    One other thought - and it is in one of the Strawberry papers - is that while the “invention” might have a legal name ... it may also have a marketing name (patent vs trademark?)

    I can’t think of an example specifically ... not being in that industry ... however here is a short article fr USA w USA example for general (non academic) audience

    What's in a plant name? Trademark vs. patent

    So - while you are seeking a peach called Nanaimo ... maybe it has a different legal name (or vice versa?) ... figuring out that detail might open some of the clues

    I notice in the strawberry chart (prev post) there is a popular one called Rainier. Ok, that stands to reason being in WA state ... now in Okanagan BC we know a sweet cherry named Rainier (i imagine it is in WA State too) ... so does each of those fruits have a diff legal name? (Then Latin name I assume) otherwise there’d be two Rainier fruits of diff species.

    Also - the article describes USA law, and I do not have any idea how long plant patents last in Canada .

    I hope you post any further info you find about the mystery peach .
     
  12. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor

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    I was acquainted with Dr. Hugh Daubeny for a few years in the early 2000s when he bought some of my BC native plants to sell at the UBC Shop in the Garden. What a very fine man he was! Completely unpretentious. In Memoriam: Hugh Daubeny | Faculty of Land and Food Systems

    I hadn't realized that he was responsible for "developing raspberry and strawberry cultivars; most notable are the Totem Strawberry and the Tulameen Raspberry, which have become the international standard for berry quality."
     
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  13. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor

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    A friend of mine here on Vancouver Island who once grew acres of u-pick strawberries in a very fertile area south of Nanaimo still swears by a strawberry called 'Sumas'.

    When I went to find more about it online, I immediately came across this article about it by H.A. Daubeny but access to the full text is 'not available'.

    'Sumas' strawberry

    'Sumas' strawberry [1987]
    Daubeny, H.A.;
     
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  14. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I don't believe I ever heard Hugh talk about dabbling with tree fruit.

    It was surreal visiting a popular high-end grocer in London in 2003 and purchasing greenhouse-grown 'Tulameen' from Spain that had been bred by someone I knew.

    Another fun fact--there are two strawberries used in a high-end ice cream brand's strawberry ice cream. One of these was developed by Hugh.
     
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  15. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Thanks for this lead, Daniel. Curious what two varieties of strawberry are used in ice cream? This year my main focus is on strawberries and have an incredible lineup of solid producers as well as some oddballs to try out. It may not have been Hugh that worked on this peach but someone, somewhere did. I still would like to know the history behind the Nanaimo Peach and to that end contacted One Green World nursery in Oregon. They don't answer their phones these days and when I left a message it was stated that their head horticulturist would get back to me. That was two weeks ago so it doesn't look like there is any info coming from them. I'll dig deeper with them in a month or so when the planting season slows down a bit. I should be able to dig into the owner of the patent on it and go from there. A girlfriend outside of Seattle had asked me what type of peach she should grow here in the PNW. Of course I mentioned the Nanaimo Peach and she ended up buying the last one from One Green World last fall. I see they are still sold out.

    I suppose I don't know all the restrictions for bringing in this peach to Nanaimo but I am told it is based on phytosanitary conditions. I know it has a patent, it has a copyright on the name Nanaimo (how does that work?) and it has a trademark too. A real triple whammy...
     
  16. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I followed links from there and got to
    PHYSICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE U.S. STRAWBERRY CULTIVARS GROWN IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST - XIE - 2004 - Journal of Food Quality - Wiley Online Library
    This 2003 article, not by Hugh, discusses Totem, Shuksan, and Puget Reliance.

    Hugh seems to have been involved in Stolo: (99+) (PDF) Stolo Strawberry | Shahrokh Khanizadeh - Academia.edu
    He won an award for that from the American Society for Horticultural Science.
    The ASHS Outstanding Fruit Cultivar Award: A 25-year Retrospective in: HortScience Volume 48 Issue 1 (2013)

    Sorry, @Al Chomica, we seem to be discussing strawberries now. And Hugh Daubeny. If you want to go back to peaches, you're going to have to take a stand. But I see you've had a hand in getting us here anyway.
     
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  17. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I believe it is 'Totem' that is used (I'd have to search a video to refresh my memory), I don't know the other.

    As for this peach: there is no registered trademark with the US Patent and Trademark Office so far: Search trademark database . Copyright doesn't / can't apply. Lastly, there is no obvious patent with the US Patent and Trademark Office, though these are more difficult to find if one doesn't know the cultivar name (cultivated varieties will have cultivar names and may have trade names -- it looks like they are asserting that Nanaimo is the trade name, but... hard to say).

    Oh, and for the record: Hugh's work for Ag Canada at the time was under the philosophy that the products of the government's work on breeding superior cultivars was for the benefit of everyone (including industry). So, the government didn't assert plant patents or the need for royalties--basically, the breeding work by Hugh was "given away". Those Spanish-grown London-bought raspberries I had? I suspect not a cent went back to Canada or to Hugh.

    Things have changed, though. You can see this with the way new cultivars of apples developed in Summerland are introduced into the market now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2021 at 1:39 PM
  18. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    Nanaimo Peach

    Cross referencing to a thread by Margot

    Did you find your tree?

    Any history details RE: this peach’s origin?

    I hope so!
     
  19. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    This is still under a search on my part. Based on posts in this thread I don't feel strongly that it was Hugh Daubney who created the peach. I have contacted One Green World twice now and just get an auto-reply that they will get back to me as soon as possible. The first time was two weeks ago and they don't answer their phones. I'll wait until the planting season slows down a bit and will pick it up when I can talk to their head horticulturist. They sell them so they obviously have a source somewhere. I hope to re-establish this PLC-resistant specimen and to that end my long-term plan is to pot up as many St Julienne plum rootstocks as I can dig out of the garden to act as future hosts. I've grafted peach, several plum varieties and two different almonds onto these rootstocks and so far everything has caught and is growing well.
     
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  20. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Rising Contributor

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    Ordering Info

    Wholesale but maybe can direct you accordingly

    Their details about respect for patents and TM’s are interesting for non-growers like me - I had not really thought about the fact someone put time and money in to these endeavours (I for example readily root a bit of forsythia or divide a rhubarb for a neighbor giveaway)
     
  21. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Yes, this was a good lead also. I called and talked to a 21-year veteran at the nursery. She couldn't remember where or when it showed up but the owner might. I have a query off to him and suspect we will speak soon enough. When talking to the horticulturist she said Canada now prohibits stone fruit and many other imports unless they come with a virus-free certificate that takes five years for a nursery to achieve. She said they were so popular in the US that it wasn't worth the effort to ship to Canada because they get sold out every year anyway. I may just change my focus and look for a living tree here around Nanaimo. How long do they live? Twenty years? Fifty? Someone must have one somewhere...
     
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  22. Al Chomica

    Al Chomica New Member

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    Oh yes. She said they did go through the process of obtaining a virus-free certificate years ago but even after paying fees their shipment was refused entry into Canada...
     

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