The fall migration

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by JT1, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    Fall is a wonderful time to get out and enjoy the garden. The weather and the progression of colors together is an unbeatable combination. It's fun to get out and see the new changes that take place every day. There is always something new to see.

    In addition to seeing the changes in color every day, its also a great time to observe new birds and even the monarch butterflies, as they make their great migration. Here is a photo of a monarch butterfly who found our Ginkgo biloba 'Tubiformis' a great place to rest overnight.

    We live on the N. coast of lake Erie, so it's amazing to think this little butterfly made it across the lake (a 57 mile flight over open water), down from Canada, and decided to rest on our Ginkgo overnight. The picture was taken in morning sun, as the Monarch warms their flight muscles in preparation to continue the journey SW to Mexico. It's very humbling to think what we would need to make such a journey and the monarch makes it on a wing and a prayer.

    Truly remarkable!
     

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  2. tsugajunkie

    tsugajunkie Active Member

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    South shore of Lake Erie, perhaps?

    I keep swamp milkweed from year to year just for the monarchs. Divine creations, indeed.

    tj
     
  3. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    I see what you mean (ha ha), but I think it's all a matter of perspective. From a vessel, it would seem to be the South shore from your location. But from land it's called the north coast or north shore, or maybe everyone in our area has it wrong? Or maybe I used it incorrectly with reference to lake Erie and it would have been more appropriate to say north shore of Ohio...
    Anyway I don't want the NE OH terminology or my inability to use it correctly to take away from the "divine creations" (a term you used so well to describe the Monarch).

    We have lots of milkweed along the shore here and on our lakeside property in the Upper peninsula of MI too. The Monarchs love it. I think, if I remember correctly, Milkweed gives life and takes it away for the monarch. The flowers provide food for the butterflies, but the milky substance in the leaves can kill the larvae if it gets too saturated by the milky substance when the larvae eats the leaves. As the larvae gets larger, then it's no longer an issue and it can eat the leaves without being overwhelmed by the milk. (I need to brush up on my Monarch documentaries to refresh my memory)
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    JT, you might not have seen Daniel's Botany Photo of the Day post on Abies religiosa and our friend, Danaus plexippus from a couple years ago--before you joined the forums. So amazing to see that many butterflies together.

    Abies religiosa and Danaus plexippus
     
  5. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    Wow Eric thank you for sharing that link. Those pictures and videos are amazing!
     

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