Test for Pesticides

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by BionicMan, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. BionicMan

    BionicMan New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delta, Canada
    Looking for some opinions. Last year I used a Weed B Gon for my lawn to remove vetch that was spreading in the front yard. To apply on my lawn, I used a sprayer that I attached at the end of my lawn hose. Not really thinking it would be an issue, but later in the year, I rinsed the same sprayer and used it to apply a fungicide to my vegetable garden.

    I am wondering if I have contaminated my vegetable garden with the Weed B Gon product? Is there a way I can get my soil tested or should I believe that everything is OK.

    Any response would be welcomed.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    PNW
    The primary ingredient in weed b gone is 2-4-d (also an ingredient in agent orange). It is a contact broadleaf herbicide and will have no effect on this year's crop of veggies. Of bigger concern is why you had to spray a fungicide in your vegetable garden. Sounds like not enough light or air movement.
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    97
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    Another question is why you decided to get rid of the Vetch?

    Vetch is good for the soil. Besides the obvious benefits of adding to the biodiversity of your lawn ecosystem, Vetch, like all legumes, fixes nitrogen in the soil to the benefit of your grass. If allowed to bloom the pollen will feed honey bees, bumblebees, and other beneficials.

    So what is wrong with it?
     

Share This Page