Tapestry lawn

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Sundrop, Apr 24, 2020.

  1. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    97
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    In relation to this thread Violets in lawns here are a few pictures of my "tapestry" lawn last summer:

    Red Clover, soil builder, very much loved by bumblebees

    Pinks blooming, when they are done Thyme, buzzing with all kinds of insects, will take their place in this part of my lawn

    Hairy vetch and Dogbane, another insects paradise

    Not only insects like my tapestry lawn. Bunnies like it too. Contrary to the horror stories, the damage they do is not that bad. True, one year they tried to get into my edible garden but digging under the fence proved to be too much trouble for them. Viola tricolor in this pic, this time blue, but the flowers can have any possible colour and almost every combination of colours.

    With the exception of dormant oil spray applied to a few selected shrubs very early in spring, I don't use any -cides on my property. All those little creatures help to keep my mini ecosystem in balance.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 24, 2020
    Georgia Strait and wcutler like this.
  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    865
    Likes Received:
    115
    Location:
    Greater Vancouver, BC Canada
    Beautiful!

    How much snow and from what month start to accumulate

    And when is snow all gone (spring month )?

    Do you water this in summer ?

    The furthest I am with tapestry at Coast is natural moss ... and some very early crocus I purpose planted in scattered patches in lawn

    Okanagan place I know well had a wild lawn mowed infrequently

    Okanagan Season started w/ snow buttercups and then pale yellow violets and then frittaleria (choc. Checkered lilies) plus many other wild flowers from March to June and early July

    and some tête à tête daffodils planted on purpose

    QUESTION - do you have a broader view picture of your overall lawn?
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    97
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    Thankyou, Georgia, for your interest.

    Where I live the snow can start to accumulate from the beginning of November, but the biggest snowfalls usually happen in the third decade of December and in January. Usually the snow is gone completely no later than by the middle of April. This year the last patches of snow disappeared just two days ago. Quite late. The climate here is cold and snowy in winter, very hot and dry in summer. The soil is sandy and well drained. I water, but only as much as to keep the vegetation alive. In my micro-climate the rain is very scarce in the summer.

    Most of my place is covered with a native grass which, over the years, I managed to restore. The grass, of course, is very well suited to the environmental conditions here, nevertheless was almost gone, replaced by aggressive alien weeds. This grass spreads only by seeds, I mow it once a year when the seeds are ripe. It always looks beautiful and is full of life.
    The part of my prop that I take care of is about one and a half acre big, and is not entirely uniform. I have to mow more often at the front of my house where the soil is too rich (improved by a Black Locust tree) for my favourite grass to grow, and is taken over by the alien, fast growing, vegetatively spreading grasses. Thankfully this area is not very big.

    Sorry, I don't have a present-day, broader pic of my lawn. Only those two little pics, one from about twenty, and another from about ten years ago, with the overall look of my prop "before" and "after".
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page