Take a walk on the wild side.....

Discussion in 'How's It Growing?' started by pmurphy, May 29, 2020.

  1. pmurphy

    pmurphy Rising Contributor

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    You should gather when ripe and make a lovely rose hip jelly from them - that's what I'll be doing with mine shortly. :)
     
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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pmurphy, a very good idea P. The trouble is it just never lasts very long in our house. The grandchildren love it, lol.
     
  3. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    @Acerholic
    I really like ' Dog rose'. and several years ago I kicked out a seedling in the soil of a friend of mine and planted it in my garden where it has now become a! "
    This winter I was reading a book on natural remedies and I discovered that Rosa canina p berries are considered the most concentrated "natural sources" in Vitamin C, present in quantities up to 50-100 times higher than oranges and lemons, and even higher to that of Goji berries and therefore able to contribute to the strengthening of the body's natural defenses. The only contraindication is the abuse that can be done.
    For this it is recommended to drink the infusion prepared as follows:
    INFUSION: 1 spoonful of pounded Rosa canina berries, 1 cup of water
    Pour the plant into the water before it reaches the boiling point. Extinguish the fire. Cover and leave to infuse for 10 min. Filter the infusion and drink it when needed in case of flu or simply for the delicious citrus flavor.
    It is indicated to lift the immune system without taking over-the-counter supplements or if you feel the classic flu symptoms.
    The rose hips are collected from the plant, washed and dried thoroughly and left to dry. They can be kept dry in glass containers until ready to use or can be purchased ready for use in herbal medicine.
    We are not yet on the plant, they will arrive in September and will be ripening around November and I was thinking of collecting and trying them but sometimes I have the doubt if my plant is truly a Rosa canina - although I believe it - because it has different flowers and berries, for example, from that of the photo inserted by you
    Rosa selvatica.jpg
    beneficios-y-propiedades-del-escaramujo-y-contraindicaciones-2.jpg
     
  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Arlette, your photos are of Rosa canina. I have known friends who have used the liquid you describe as an aid in Winter to help boost the immune system and swear by it.
    @pmurphy, has mentioned earlier about Rose hip jelly, now I know there is a lot of sugar in the ingredients, but it is so nice.

    Nature does offer all the necessary foods, if we are prepared to look.
     
  5. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    A few days ago it was mentioned that there were no Acorns on the Oaks.( Canada I believe).
    Here are some we saw whilst on our daily walk a few minutes ago. The acorns are now forming in Southern England.

    Quercus robur ' English Oak'.
     

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  6. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning, well the berries are swelling quickly now. These from our morning walk. The first two are Prunus domestica 'Wild Plum' and the last four are Sorbus aucuparia 'Rowan'.
    Old tales say that more berries will mean a hard Winter. Time will tell, as the trees and bushes are very full at the moment.
     

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  7. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    Morning walk: a plant and a memory:
    Arctium minus (3).jpg Arctium minus (Asteraceae)
    The plant:
    These are herbaceous plants with large basal leaves, a large taproot root and a high floral scape (issued in the second year of life) bearing an inflorescence formed by flower heads surrounded by hooked bracts which, when ripe, easily attach themselves to the fleece of the animals or clothes, thus promoting the dispersion of seeds.
    In addition to the known anti-inflammatory properties and food uses of some of its parts, the flower heads were considered by children to be an infallible weapon of spite, since, thrown into the opponent's hair, they forced long maneuvers to be untangled.

    The memory is of childhood when, to my great joy, we spent the summer in the countryside. Forget the city rules and behavior I was around all day and you can say I lived with the inhabitants of the small town and you went to graze sheep, to collect potatoes, one attended the splendid harvest lunch on the threshing floor! And I lay down on the grass and followed the flight of blackbirds, watched the little ones of the goldfinches tear off the dried lappole (flower heads) of the sour fruits and with these I engaged in battles using them as hooked bullets that remained attached to hair and clothes (the most bratty they stuck them in the spokes of the bikes that reared up making the unfortunate little cyclists fall).
    Until the abhorrent return to the city !!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Arlette, my wife and I just read your childhood memories Arlette and we loved them. Thankyou so much for sharing these.
     
  9. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    @Acerholic Well, in the countryside I turned, how to say, into a rural tomboy !!!Do you have Burdock in your area?
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Arlette, a 'rural' tom boy, now that's something new, lol
    Yes we have Burdock, I will take a photo next time we are out walking.
    Isn't it amazing how the senses invoke such vivid memories. And childhood ones can be so wonderful.
    Have a lovely day Arlette.
     
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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  12. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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  13. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    We found this along our river walk this morning a Symphoricarpos albus 'Snowberry'. Rather pretty amongst the brambles!!!
     

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  14. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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  15. pmurphy

    pmurphy Rising Contributor

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    Went cycling on the West Dyke Trail in Richmond yesterday; scenery was beautiful but only made a couple of stops for photos.
     

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  16. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pmurphy, a perfect haven for bees, butterflies and insects. Lovely photos P.
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The Lythrum of course isn't part of the local ecology and may spread to dominate the area shown in future. On another subject single quotes are used in a horticultural context to indicate cultivar names and not common ones.
     
  18. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Sometimes things are not where they are meant to be.
    Found this Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora amongst brambles along our river walk this morning. Couldn't get very close at all, but just managed to get a photo. Quality not too good, but it shows how plants can spread on the breeze or by birds to places they are not meant to be.
     

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  19. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    This mornings walk along a very quiet footpath near to us, only threw up this one, it is Epilobium hirsutum or Great willowherb. It does seem to be trying to take over. Very invasive if not controlled, but worth showing on this thread as it is still pretty.
     

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  20. pmurphy

    pmurphy Rising Contributor

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    Went back to the dog park early this morning and found some interesting things growing, unfortunately most are invasives or escapees, but still interesting...

    Last image is the native Indian Plum - Oemleria cerasiformis - showing a signs of the times; it is one of the first trees to leaf out in the spring and one of the first to start turning color...
     

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  21. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pmurphy, good evening P, the Symphoricarpos albus Snowberry is cropping up everywhere it seems. The Clematis vitalba is very pretty indeed.
    Wonderful photo of the Lonicera involucrata Bearberry, excellent close up.
    As you say the Indian plum is showing signs of drought, but what isn't at the moment.

    Enjoyed these P.
     
  22. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    I did not know the Lonicera involucrata var. invlucrata and I find it beautiful!
     
  23. pmurphy

    pmurphy Rising Contributor

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    We've only just begun getting warm dry weather in the last couple of weeks and even my tree (which gets watered every other day) is starting to turn color: this tree actually starts turning yellow in mid-summer, and it will be one of the first to drop it's leaves for fall.
     
  24. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pmurphy, that is interesting P. I did think it was environmental reasons. There has been a lot of talk on the maples forum about trees getting their Autumn colours very early this year.
     
  25. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Indian plum has been said to be characteristic of winter wet - summer dry soil moisture regimes such as river terraces. Consistent with this I see a lot of them starting to shed during summer each year. And it does leaf out in February, so that by July it has actually gotten in 5 months of being in leaf.
     

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