Take a walk on the wild side.....

Discussion in 'How's It Growing?' started by pmurphy, May 29, 2020.

  1. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Yes I agree - Hence “if (Big if)

    I mean, Broom is considered ok in Scotland to this day I presume?

    You make a valid point thank you
     
  2. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    But then on the other hand, the BC Invasive Species Council, would appear to disagree. And we are in B.C. not the British Isles. Perhaps in the UK, the climate is not quite so likeable for this iris? I don't really know.

    For the record, I think this iris is really quite lovely. But having tried to get rid of even just a small amount of it, I can tell you it's an awful lot of work. Personally, I would grow it, as long as I could keep it under control, which shouldn't be that difficult.
     
  3. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm a bit confused. Disagree about what exactly?

    Neither of the 2 plants discussed recently here - Broom and Yellow Iris - are native to this area so they are rightly designated as 'invasive'.
     
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  4. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Sorry Margot, I didn't mean to cause any confusion. W Cutler noted that the Iris shouldn't be called invasive in her post, with her reasoning. The BC Invasive Species Council apparently does not agree with that. That is all I meant. I am in agreement with you regarding both plants, for the simple reason that our BC Council has them so designated. As you well know, I'm the most innocent of novices when it comes to any plants and I'm definitely not trying to argue with anyone.

    The story I originally heard about the Broom was that 4 seeds were brought over from Scotland in one of the old sailboats, well before the time of any conceived air travel, and that they are the source of the millions of Broom plants here today. Whether or not that is true I don't know.
     
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  5. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  6. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Back to our walk on the wild side, our neighbour directly across the road says that she has seen raccoons at their place very recently. We have not seen them here yet, and I hope we don't. But we have seen one skunk who ventured into the carport some time last year rooting around in the garbage. Fortunately no damage and he left without spraying the place down. We often run into their "perfume" in one area just before we get to Scotch Creek, although I have not yet seen a skunk in person there.
     
  7. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    In that case, I must be the one who is confused Margot.

    This is the statement I was referring to. "You can't call a plant growing in its native range invasive." I must have somehow misunderstood that. No point in beating a dead horse further, and if I am in error, as now appears to be the case, my apologies to Wendy Cutler.
     
  8. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    There are a number of versions of that story but what they all have in common is that the millions of Broom plants we are trying to eliminate these days originated from a very few seeds. As I was reporting in another post, a mature Broom plant (which can live for 25 years) can produce up to 3500 pods a year, each containing 5–12 seeds, and those seeds can survive in the soil for 30 years. Obviously we'll never be rid of it but try to contain it as much as possible.

    I am very grateful to and encouraged by the efforts of mostly volunteers to cut Broom beside roadways and highways. What a difference it makes to see only the native vegetation - Nootka rose, Lonicera ciliata, Ninebark, salal, ferns and so many other beautiful plants as you drive without the jarring yellow of Broom.
     
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  9. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Along with the version of the Broom seeds that I heard, was a note that the seeds could be viable for up to 70 years! I cannot say that I have noticed Broom here in the North Shuswap, but I will be looking out for them now!
     
  10. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Margot, I glossed over your mention of the Nootka Rose far too quickly. I wonder if it is possible that this is the wild rose we have growing on our south lot? Perhaps if I put a tele lens on the camera I can get a better photo of it. The bank that it lives on is way too steep and unkempt to climb down for a closer look.

    IMG_4742.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2021
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    My comment was made regarding to the advice to Acerholic, who lives in England, to tell his village council to get rid of it if it is invasive.
    The BC Invasive Species Council gets to call it invasive in BC.
     
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  12. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Wendy, thank you most sincerely for clearing this up for us! Again, my apologies for my misunderstanding.
     
  13. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Back to roses again, search "rosa eflora bc" and you will see information about all the native roses in BC. Look at the distribution map to find out if whatever species you may consider is likely to be growing in your area. The 2 I find most here on the coast are Rosa nutkana and Rosa gymnocarpa but there are about a dozen other rose species that grow in BC. It's fun to try and figure out what may be growing near you. Good luck!
     
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  14. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    So many topics are interwoven in this thread tonight! Just to make the fabric even more interesting, I thought I'd add the observation that, before my family left Burnaby after over 50 years there, it became nightly 'tradition' to smell skunks around 2 to 3 in the morning. After a while we realized it wasn't skunks at all but cannabis grow-ups venting their spaces. This in what you might consider a fairly 'high rent' area, just another reason to leave.
     
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  15. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    Thank you Margot, I will do that. But first I will need to get a much better photo. As far as I'm aware, these roses have been growing wild here long before we got the property. I did some basic clearing on that lower lot several years ago, just cutting the trees down to get the view, and I believe the roses have done well since then. I think some of them are about ten feet tall. Off to do my search now!
     
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  16. Keith Elliott

    Keith Elliott Rising Contributor

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    I think that the skunks can out-smell the cannabis people by a mile, it's quite a different odour. I understand that there has been approval for a commercial grow-op somewhere over in the Celista area, but far away from the highway that skirts the lake. It might even be in operation by now, although I don't know precisely where it is. I do recall the locals getting up in arms about it when the announcement was made and they even had a picture of the huge building where it was to be located.
     
  17. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I would disagree. Even the resident experts who lived in our house in those days were not always sure where that enticing odour originated.

    Wherever, I can't stand the smell either of skunks or weed.
     
  18. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Hello Margot - I am having trouble with distribution map recently — it says a msg about how it’s been upgraded

    Then it says “not available”

    I like to use my iPhone to look if I am out and about, so that’s how I noticed this hiccup - then again, maybe I am the technopeasant :)

    Maybe someone else with older iPhone can test the map
     
  19. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    I was surprised to see Monotropa uniflora today during my morning walk in the woods. Seems a bit late in the year for them. Last two pictures are from the beginning of July last year. They are fascinating. I still have not found any information about what causes the pigmentation in some of them.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2021

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