Take a walk on the wild side.....

Discussion in 'How's It Growing?' started by pmurphy, May 29, 2020.

  1. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Thankyou Ron, it's always been known to us all here as Lesser celandine, but I bow to your expert knowledge. I will add an edit to my post.
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Many Pacific dogwood have been affected by anthracnose. We're growing some at UBC BG from seed collected in the Pemberton area which don't seem to be as readily-affected by anthracnose in situ. We'll see how they do when they are at sites where the fungus is known to be present.
     
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  3. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm getting confused. I thought Mahonia nervosa (a low-growing species) had a more dull and elongated leaf than appears in post #342. Part of the problem for me is that I have a large patch of what I think is Mahonia aquifolium (tall-growing) that has never grown taller than about 18 inches in over 15 years. It couldn't really be M. nervosa could it?
     

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  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good evening, that seems quite strange for me to say evening,as I'm usually on here very early in the morning. But today due to other more mundane things that had to be done, it was an afternoon walk in some lovely warm Spring sunshine along the River Itchen.
    So here we found a couple of things that might be of interest. Plus a very proud new mum to be.....
    Pentaglottis sempervirens Birds eye 200.JPG Pentaglottis sempervirens Birds Eye 201.JPG Salix eleagnos bitter willow 200.JPG Salix eleagnos bitter willow 201.JPG
    From the top, Pentaglottis sempervirens Birds eye, Salix eleagnos bitter willow, and the proud mum to be Mute Swan... watch for further updates, lol.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 22, 2021
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    @Margot Here is a comparison of Berberis nervosa: Cascade Oregon-grape from Southpoint Dr, Burnaby, BC, CA on April 02, 2021 at 04:48 PM by Daniel Mosquin · iNaturalist and Berberis aquifolium: Oregon grape from Southpoint Dr, Burnaby, BC, CA on April 02, 2021 at 04:52 PM by Daniel Mosquin · iNaturalist

    For Berberis nervosa, note the radiating veins from the leaf base. That is also evident in the hummingbird photo you shared. For Berberis aquifolium, it is like the photo you shared on Tuesday -- a single major vein down the middle of the leaf.
     
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  6. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    That's wonderful that efforts are being made to develop anthracnose-resistant Cornus nuttallii. I have high hopes for one I grew from seed collected near Lantzville. Only one of 24 seeds germinated and, so far, the tree has no problems but maybe it's not really being put to the test. Still, the dogwood population in this area has been decimated as it has elsewhere so it must be around. The tree I took the seeds from seemed very healthy.
     
  7. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Thank you @Daniel Mosquin for describing an easy way to distinguish Berberis nervosa and B. aquifolium other than the shininess of the leaves which I've been going by. Height alone certainly isn't enough! :-) By the way, we should give credit for the hummingbird photo to @StevenS.
     
  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  9. StevenS

    StevenS Active Member

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    @Margot & @Daniel Mosquin I have just revisited VanDusen. I found three tags Mahonia nervosa, Mahonia repens and Mahonia aquifolium throughout the garden but no tag was found at the spot where I took the hummingbird shot.
     
  10. StevenS

    StevenS Active Member

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    No worries.
     
  11. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    It is possible that the Mahonia spread by rhizomes or grew from seed in that spot. They self-seed prolifically in my garden.
     
  12. StevenS

    StevenS Active Member

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    It's also possible that I missed the tag.
     
  13. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    There are all sorts of possibilities . . . someone took the tag so as to remember the name (that happens a lot with other plants) OR a crow picked it up and took it into its nest OR it was raked up by gardeners tidying the garden OR . . . it grew there all on its own, OR you missed the tag. Better go back and look.
     
  14. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning, my wife and I at this time of the year like to go to our local woods and just sit and take in the perfume of all the Bluebells.
    So this morning we packed up a blanket, flask of our favourite coffee and of course some Highland shortbread.
    It was a very short distance from our house, but sat there in the morning sun with the birds singing, everything was right in the world. So after a few shortbread, (well more than a few if I'm honest), I took these photos to share with my friends on the forum, with Bluebells and new bracken right by our feet. The last photo shows that children are at last getting out and about enjoying the woodland.
    Bracken in Otterbourne woods 206.JPG Bracken in Otterbourne woods 205.JPG Bluebells in Otterbourne woods 205.JPG Childrens den Otterbourne woods 205.JPG
     
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  15. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    Just in time, as its name suggests, Maianthemum canadense is almost ready to begin blooming in May.
     

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  16. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    What an amazing contrast N, is that near your garden? Or is it your garden?
     
  17. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    Hi D, technically it is a section of our yard, completely wild. It is on top of the highest rock outcrop in our property. They grow best within the moss on top of rocks. I consider them a weed in my ‘maintained moss garden’.
    I went for a hike today on the trails of the Nature preserve that borders our yard, here are some pictures. I find joy even in the simplest things, like emerging oak and maple seedling leaves. The highlight for me almost always are the giant royal ferns in the wetlands.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2021
  18. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    We think alike N. Also loved your photos. There is something about the wild look that makes everything that is going on around us all seem so insignificant.
    You live in an amazing place..
     
  19. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Nik - still looking at your post #365, I must say I love those little Maianthemums, so perfect growing on top of the rock. Looking up Maianthemum canadense on the E-Flora BC distribution map, I see they grow right across the continent, even into BC though not anywhere near where I live.

    Here on the west coast, we see the similar Maianthemum dilatatum which can spread far and wide in woodsy settings. I'm sure I will soon regret planting it near my house but it sure is pretty. Another Maianthemum I admire grows much larger and can be found across NA right to the east coast where you live . . . Maianthemum racemosum (used to be Smilacina racemosum). Are you familiar with it?
     

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  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    If that is what you have by your house Margot, then I agree, what a wonderful carpet of green. Together with the white flowers they produce, then it's perfect. My wife and I do love green and white in the garden.
     
  21. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    Hi Margot, yes I believe I have seen racemosum in the woods around here.
    Do not worry too much about dilatatum. They are not too aggressive spreaders. All I do for mine is pluck the leaves in early spring in the areas I don’t want it. That seems to be enough.
    They are pretty though. I love your planting next to the house! They are very vibrant green.
    I wish for my yard that the deer had a taste for them, that will save me the weeding... sadly they don’t.
     
  22. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    Reporting from the mainland Sunshine Coast - so many dogwoods (the native ones) looking good and healthy in emerging bloom right now — they started during that long hot spell mid April

    I do recall when the disease struck a few years ago but I do not see evidence now

    In fact I have one growing from seed - likely planted by our local native Douglas Squirrel

    I remember growing up here in coastal BC - we were taught by old timers
    1. Do not pick our native province emblem
    2. What looks like flowers - no they are leaves
    3. Rarely does dig & transplant work out well (just like arbutus)
    4. Oh and what I would do for some clean dogwood carpet and one of those dogwood ash tray stands off old BC ferries! Obviously I would use it as a plant stand - I can still hear the clang of the custodian emptying those trays on last ferry shift and we’d finally be getting to cabin (way back years as sleepy kids)
    Photo below with our longtime 1960s / 70s BC Premier (like USA state governor)
    60 years since the start of BC Ferries

    QUESTION - @Daniel Mosquin
    Is it same disease that killed a lot of arbutus here - there are dead branches and entirely dead trees still evident after 10-15 years ... i remember seeing them over the mtn pass to Port Alberni and up the coast too.
     

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  23. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    The dogwoods I see blooming in my area right now look very healthy too. Wouldn't it be wonderful if anthracnose-resistance has naturally developed in some of them and is being passed on to new generations? I started a tree from seed quite a few years ago and it has grown to about 8 feet or so but still hasn't bloomed.
    I find dogwood seedlings growing in my garden, probably introduced by birds but can't be sure if they are the native dogwoods. I wonder if Eddie's White Wonder has viable seeds? The Cornus 'Eddie's White Wonder' that was growing here when we moved in developed anthracnose regardless of its known resistance so I took it down quickly.

    I too remember the cautions that it was illegal at one time to pick trilliums or transplant dogwoods. I think there was quite a run on them during the 1950s.
    That law is no longer in place but it is still good advice to leave these beauties in the wild.
     
  24. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Arbutus or Pacific madrone is host to a suite of diseases with multiple diseases that can attack at one time.

    As for dogwoods looking fine this spring, so are some other typically disease-encumbered plants (like Malus). I would guess it has to do with the number of rainfall-free days we've had.
     
  25. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    It's not just this spring. I think that the fact that many dogwoods are still alive, healthy and a good size speaks to their resistance to anthracnose year after year.
     

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