Propagation: Swiss cheese plant seeds

Discussion in 'Araceae' started by JenRi, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Hey all!

    I have recently acquired 3 swiss cheese plant seeds, I have planted one so far but I am unsure what conditions they require for germination, I could only find very limited information online. Does anyone have any experience with these seeds that can give me some tips? The information that came with them was brief, just said to plant them 1/4" deep in peaty soil, which I *think* I did (if peaty soil is ordinary compost)
    Does anyone have any experience with these seeds and can give me some tips?

    Thanks:)

    JenRi
     
  2. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    peat is different than soil. you can buy peat moss at a garden center or even the big box places like home depot or lowes (in the garden section).

    they need constant moisture - not totally soggy, just moist and should be kept somewhat covered to keep moisture/humidity levels up. you can use a plastic bag over the tray for that. keep in indirect light and keep them warm.
     
  3. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Ahhh so it probably won't germinate in Houseplant compost? Okay I can do that....will they germinate without light? I was thinking of putting it them the airing cupboard with my tray of cactus seeds?

    Thanks:)
     
  4. bertoli55

    bertoli55 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi, just to make sure we're talking about the same plant, do you mean Monstera deliciosa? If so, I've mainly propogated these from cuttings but when I have germinated seed I've never used peat -too epensive here. Your compost mix should be fine as long as you don't let it dry out.
    I usually use a compost/ sand mix with a wetting agent. The wetting agent is because we have hot dry summers with low relative humidity eg today's max was 41.8C and the RH is 15%. The sand is because that is our basic soil :)
    Sorry can't comment about germinating them in the dark except to say can't see why not though I've never germinated any seeds that way.
     
  5. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Yes I did mean Monstera Deliciosa....I haven't used any sand in my compost mix but it does already contain a wetting agent so it should be okay.

    The only thing I'm concerned about is temperature....it's not very warm here, and the windowsill where the light is, is probably the coldest place in the room. I've taken to placing the pot with the seed in on the radiator in the evenings, so it gets a bit of warmth but I'm still not sure it's hot enough.

    Do you think it might be worth planting one in the airing cupboard as well and see if it makes a difference...? I don't really want TWO plants as I know they grow big but I'm sure I could find a home for one if they both germinated...or sell it.

    Bertolli, how long did yours usually take to germinate? I was told to expect 8-12 weeks!

    Thanks for you help:)
     
  6. bertoli55

    bertoli55 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi JenRi
    I'd keep your pot where ever you can maintain reasonable warmth -without cooking your seed :) It is probably worthwhile planting the three seeds just incase they don't all germinate. You'll always find a home for any exrtra plants.
    Sorry, it is ages since i grew a monstera from seed and can't quite remember how long it takes. If someone local has told you 8-12 weeks then that may be right for your conditions.
    BTW you don't need sand in your mix -i only have it because my garden is basically sand, compost and mulch. Good luck with the seeds -update us on how they are going.
     
  7. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Okay thanks:) well I might plant another and keep it in the airing cupboard, where it will probably be warm enough.

    No problemo, I doubt it would have been much help anyway since you live in Austrailia!

    Ha, I bet that's helpful for growing cacti?

    I will do - thanks for your help:)
     
  8. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Update: We have germination :D ! And after only two weeks, I was quite impressed - I guess it must like my radiator lol. Just a shame my housemate turned the amount of hours its on down...I was just about to plant a second!
     

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  9. bertoli55

    bertoli55 Active Member 10 Years

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    Congratulations on the new arrival :). How long do you leave seedlings in your airing cupboard?
     
  10. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Thanks:D. I don't actually, now it's germinated it lives on the windowsill. I thought it'd need as much light as possible so it can photosynthesise and grow big and strong, should I start putting it on the radiator again for the remaining 3 hours its on in the evenings?

    Thanks:)
     
  11. bertoli55

    bertoli55 Active Member 10 Years

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    I was hoping that it was out of the cupboard :)
    Sorry can't really help with growing things in the cold -I don't have any experience at all.
    I would grow all of the seeds though and experiment to see which method works best in your environment.
     
  12. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Good....I was worried then for a minute! Well I'll leave him on the window sill for the moment, apparentely Monstera deliciosa don't like less than 10C, I think my window sill might sometimes drop below that...but it won't for much longer so I'm guessing all that will happen is he'll grow a bit slower (probably a good thing!). Thanks for your advice:)
     
  13. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    congrats on germination!!

    i'd get the other seeds going as well because they do tend to lose viability the longer you wait.
     
  14. aahhaa

    aahhaa Member

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    I got interested & googled Monstera Deliciosa; was surprised to find this info:
    When it first flowers, the fruit contains so much oxalic acid that it is poisonous, causing immediate and painful blistering and irritation, swelling, itching, and loss of voice. It takes a year for the fruit to ripen, at which point it is safe to eat.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monstera_deliciosa

    Norman Van Aken explains: "You owe it to yourself to experience Monsteras." Native to Central America and widely eaten in the tropics, they taste like a tropical fruit, a mix of mango, pineapple, and banana.
    http://www.deliciousorganics.com/recipes/monstera.htm

    WARNING
    All parts of Monstera deliciosa are poisonous except the ripe fruits. The plant contains oxalic acid and even the ripe fruits may be an irritant to particularly sensitive people.
    http://www.floridata.com/ref/M/mons_del.cfm

    Whew! Are you guys planning on eating, or just looking?:]
     
  15. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Just looking lol. Swiss Cheese plant is such a silly name for a plant that not only isn't edible but is actually poisonous! I'm going to start calling it by its proper name as I really don't want to confuse people:-S. Thanks for that information aahaa, i'll have to be sure to keep it out of the way of our dogs when I go home over Easter - one of them kept on eating the dracaena we had until I rescued it!
     

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