Summer Grafting

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Kaitain4, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    This weekend I did a little summer grafting - my first time. I was a lot more conservative this time, only making 20 grafts. 15 are on Acer palmatum rootsock, and 5 are on Acer pseudosiebolianum rootstock (hardy to Zone 4). So this small lot is an experiment on several levels.

    Here's where I find myself confused. Winter grafting seems to be extremely straight forward - cut dormant scion, graft onto rootstock, keep humid and wait. Summer grafting seems to be all over the map in comparison. Some say to graft onto understock and leave the understock growing, others say to cut the understock completely off at the graft. Some say to remove the leaves and petioles, others say to leave the petioles, and sill others say to remove all but 2 leaves. In lieu of any definitive documentation, I put together the best ideas for me and did the grafts (see pics) as best I could. I did them pretty much the same was as winter grafts, but I left the petioles on the stems, and I used Parafilm this time in addition to the grafting strips. I cranked up the air conditioning in the Studio, and everything is nice and cool. So now my question is this - do I need to place bags over the scions, or is Parafilm enough? Am I botching this big time? Something I overlooked? I need the opinions of those who know...


    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    Looking good Kaitain

    I would be concerned only how leggy, but thats all.
     
  3. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Kat,

    This is grafting, so you want "spindly'. Its completely different from seed-grown, and its how most of the Japanese Maples you see at the nursery are grown.

    Take a look at this thread - go to the 2nd page and click on the link in the entry dated March 6th. It will show you the process...

    :)

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=48128
     
  4. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    No K4,

    I don't want spindly. I was saying yours look that way lol but you explained so thats fine.

    I *will look at your link though out of interest.

    Great specimens!
     
  5. kbguess

    kbguess Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    334
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    K4,

    I have always bagged mine. Mine are bagged 2-3 weeks then taken off completely. No "weaning".

    Inside with AC I'd expect the air to be relatively dry, so I would bag.

    That said, 'simple' appeals to me, so next year I might try a few without bagging to compare.

    Let us know how yours do


    Keith
     
  6. scalor75

    scalor75 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    italy north !
    in august it's too late to grafting a maple ?
     
  7. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    Its still the growing season so Sap will still be on the up,

    I think that sort of means yes lol
     
  8. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Keith,

    Thanks for the advice. I did indeed bag, and I'm glad of it.


    Scalor,

    You're not too late yet, but you must hurry.
     
  9. scalor75

    scalor75 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    italy north !
    i have grafted the acer !
    i hope !
     
  10. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Congrats Scalor!!


    Keith,

    The grafts seem to doing OK. The petioles are falling off and there are tiny buds beneath (see pics). My question now is, do you allow the understock to continue to grow, or do you cut it off. Do you want the scions to break bud, or do you want them to be dormant until next year?

    Thanks!

    DV
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    Hmmm..great grafting going on!

    Amazing images.
     
  12. kbguess

    kbguess Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    334
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    K4

    I don't have a particular plan for removing understock. I try to judge the vigor of the scion after it pushes and I will leave the understock with a few leaves until I am convinced the scion is strong enough alone.

    As for scion pushing or not pushing I prefer they push (to enjoy the new growth), but have had some that didn't and they did fine the next year.

    I did try some grafts without bagging just to see what would happen and they were all crispy in less than 2 weeks.


    keith
     
  13. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Thanks Keith. Great info.

    I took the baggie off one graft just to test and it was shriveled in a couple of days. Definitely need that extra protection and high humidity. I am anxiously awaiting more signs of life from this little group of grafts...
     
  14. koiboy

    koiboy Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California, USA
    I feel totally confused. I really want to try and perform some grafts in the months ahead, but I'm not sure what to do. I was intending to graft at the end of winter/beginning of spring, but I don't have a space to keep them in where the temperature can stay between 65 and 70 degrees. I then looked into summer grafting but I have problems there as well. Summer temperatures where I live in central California during June through August are in the high 90s to low 100s, and again I don't have a space where I can keep the temperatures in the high 60s to low 70s. I do have a large area covered in shade cloth that is adjacent to the east side of my house, but that's it. Any suggestions anyone, or do I have to build a greenhouse? Even if I do build a greenhouse though, without a heat source, will it be the right temperature during the late winter and early spring to properly care for the grafts? Argghh!
     
  15. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Do you have a room in your house you could press into service? I know Diana at Topiary Gardens grafts about 1000 plants a year and she does it all in her living room....
     
  16. koiboy

    koiboy Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California, USA
    unfortunately no. My wife and three kids just moved into a smaller home a few months ago so that my wife can stay home with our children. I have some backyard space (I currently have about 500 maples growing in one gallon pots), but no area where I can keep a constant temperature. If I did winter grafting in say February, but placed the grafts in an outdoor greenhouse, do you think that would work?
     

Share This Page