Suitable shrubs for containers?

Discussion in 'Small Space Gardening' started by Cazza, Oct 15, 2002.

  1. Cazza

    Cazza Member

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    I'd like to try growing a deciduous shrub in a container on my east-facing balcony which gets about 3 hours of direct morning sun. I'm quite partial to enkianthus (campanulatus or perulatus), but is it too large to be confined to a container? Would viburnum plicatum "summer snowflake" or hydrangea macrophylla be more successful choices? Thank you.
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Does it have to be deciduous? Dave Grieser at the UBC gardens recommended Choysia ternata - Mexican Mock Orange to me for a balcony. I found some photos and descriptions on the internet that make it sound like a very attractive plant. Some sites said it needs full sun, others said sun or dappled shade, others said sun or shade. Dave said shade should be fine. The white flowers in the spring are fragrant and the leaves are aromatic when crushed.
     
  3. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    Suitable shrubs for containers

    Either species of Enkianthus should be fine in a container, providing it is large enough. If you have the space, a half barrel would be ideal. With its roots more constrained, your plant won't grow as large as it would in the garden. But after a few years, it may begin to deteriorate, and at that point you may want to plant it perhaps in a friend's garden and start again.
    Viburnum "summer snowflake" prefers a sunnier spot, and therefore Viburnum opulus would probably be a better choice for your conditions. It has similar flower heads and is followed by bright red fruits.
    Smaller species of Hydrangea macrophylla or serrata would be fine. H. serrata 'bluebird' grows to about 3 feet and has deep blue lacecap flowers.
    Deciduous shrubs are a good choice for your conditions, as many of the evergreen shrubs are more susceptible to damage from winter sun, spring frosts and cold winds.
    Good luck!
     

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