Suggestions for Garden Redesign

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by jogardener, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. jogardener

    jogardener Member

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    Location:
    Vernon, B.C. Canada
    I have an east facing front yard with the original 20 year old landscaping, overgrown shrubs -- a beautiful red japanese maple tree and laceleaf maple that I want to keep, the lawn soil is mostly sand and grows lots of moss and has a slope at the front that I want to eliminate. There is also what appears to be a healthy 30 ft. spruce tree at the front of the yard which now obstructs the view out the front window, which although beautiful I think it has to go. What I envision is taking out all the shrubs and trees except for the 2 maples mentioned, building up the slope in the front to level out the yard definining a large curved garden with stone eding and adding a variety of grasses, perhaps a water feature some type of low growing evergreens to hide the concrete foundation, some colorful perennials and perhaps some rock -- and then a small area of lawn. Does anyone have any suggestions on resources for planning this type of garden or know of things that I should consider based on the information given. Any tips, suggestions, etc. would be appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Some ideas that come to mind are:

    Gradual, naturalistic contours are more restful than abrupt terraces.

    Weeping laceleaf maples, due to their aberrant appearance do not often blend well with other plants. Since you also have a view you wish to feature it might be best to clear most of the old stuff out and limit most of the new planting to low, carpeting plants and other elements compatible visually with the maple(s) and not competing with the view for attention. If you ended up with one maple on the left and the other on the right, framing the view that could be quite successful.

    Local advice, layouts etc. can be gotten from garden designers or landscape architects. The latter cost more but especially if you are going to change the grade a LA may be needed to bring their professional credentials into the picture. There may even be municipal requirements to be met.
     
  3. jogardener

    jogardener Member

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    Thanks Ron, that is helpful -- I think you are right about getting advice from a garden designer or landscape architect.
     

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