sugar food

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by kenneth3, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. kenneth3

    kenneth3 Member

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    garland, tx
    can a plant be feed sugar to create more energy?
     
  2. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Kenneth--many agronomists use sugar and molasses on farms. I've never done it myself, but the strategy is to use these items to feed the soil microbes which in turn feed the plant roots.

    I'm not real sure what situation this would be done, probably just a short term deal during adverse weather or other conditions where the soil life needed a "kick start", as it's a pretty un-natural way for the soil to be fed.

    Normally, the organic matter in the soil breaks down into things like sugar, and this feeds that chain of living things in the root zone.
     
  3. bioramani

    bioramani Member

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    I have heard that a weak sugar solution helps in rooting of cuttings. I ened up with a lot of ants in the pot the only time I tried it. The cuttings did root . They might have done it even without the sugar.

    bioramani
     
  4. Don Ho

    Don Ho Active Member

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    Greetings Kenneth,

    I am a new user to this forum and this is my first posting, so I thought I would jump in feet first! Using sugar as a soil food is a great method for feeding and increasing the populations of beneficial soil bacteria. "Plant roots often supply the simple sugars, protiens and carbohydrates that bacteria eat, but that may not be enough." (from Lawns for Canada-Lone Pine Publishing, Pg. 92) Using sugar, and a variety of other bacterial foods including fish emulsion, will help increase the growth rate and populations of the soil bacteria. We have, through our horticultural and agricultural practices, severely decreased the diversity and populations of soil life (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, etc.). Reintroducing the soil life with composts and compost teas, and helping that reintroduced life along by providing some extra food, will lead to healthier plants and a healthier environment. The works of Dr. Elaine Ingham are worth exploring for more information on this topic.
     

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