Ferns: Struthiopteris spicant, Deer Fern

Discussion in 'Plants with Spores (Ferns, Mosses, et al.)' started by wcutler, Aug 5, 2020.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm posting things I'm trying to learn, so if I have this wrong, please let me know. This seems to be Deer Fern, Struthiopteris spicant, growing in front of an apartment building in my neighbourhood. These photos show the sterile fronds, with the pinnae close together, and fertile fronds, with the pinnae spaced out at least 1 cm apart. The stipes and rachis are almost black. This used to be called Blechnum spicant.
    Struthiopteris-spicant_1098NicolaNelson_Cutler_20200803_132854.jpg Struthiopteris-spicant_1098NicolaNelson_Cutler_20200803_132909.jpg Struthiopteris-spicant_1098NicolaNelson_Cutler_20200803_132954.jpg Struthiopteris-spicant_1098NicolaNelson_Cutler_20200803_133011.jpg Struthiopteris-spicant_1098NicolaNelson_Cutler_20200803_132924.jpg
     
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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hard Fern on this side of the Atlantic. Not sure if there's any infraspecific distinction between European and N American plants; yours looks perhaps more erect and jumbled - over here, the sterile fronds typically lie fairly flat, with only the spore-bearing fronds erect.
     

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  3. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks, Michael. Wikipedia: Struthiopteris spicant - Wikipedia, gives both as common names. I have never heard anyone say "Hard Fern", so just used the name I knew in the title.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Looked up a bit; what's really odd is the distribution – Europe (& adjacent NW Africa), and western North America. There are some other species of Struthiopteris in eastern Asia though. Makes me suspect that one day genetic analysis will show that the European and N American popualtions should be split as separate species.

    Equisetum telmateia has a somewhat similar distribution; with this, the western N American population is treated as a separate subspecies.
     
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  5. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    E-Flora BC still lists it as Blechnum spicant with Struthiopteris spicant given as a synonym or alternate name.

     
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  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Ed Alverson went with Struthiopteris spicant (L.) Weiss. for the Second Edition of Hitchcock & Cronquist, Flora of the Pacific Northwest (2018, University of Washington).
     
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  7. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Are you saying that this is the name to use?
     
  8. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  9. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It's the struth.

    I've seen giant plants that are twice the size of normal ones in northern California, and thought they might be polyploid, but they seemed to be within the scope of species description.
     
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  10. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    A video from UBC Faculty of Forestry on this just came up on my facebook and instagram feeds, using the name Blechnum spicant.

    I'm not making a point about the name, just linking to a video that gives what seems to be a clear way to distinguish this from sword ferns.
     
  11. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    ———
    I am so glad you posted this informative video

    For one- I thought the curled over leaves on my own deer ferns meant dehydrated or dying (approx 1:27 in video)

    How do we see these Forestry faculty videos without having to be on FBook?
     

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  12. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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  13. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here is another very good short video on deer fern, from the Beaty Biodiversity Museum:
    Facebook
    I'm sure you don't have to log on to Facebook to see these.
     
  14. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  15. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I've added this video and this guy's other fern videos to the new ferns and mosses resource file.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
  16. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    That's great. The new forum will be well-stocked with good resources right from the start. I tried to find a single link to ferns on E-Flora BC but could not.
     

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