Identification: Strange lattice-looking growth

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by kacarman, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    I found this strange looking growth at the base of a blueberry bush that has been struggling for a couple of months. I unfortunately kicked it over before I could get good pictures of it, but it was ball shaped, about the size of my fist. The branches almost looked like a tapeworm with the segments. The stem was hollow and looked like some of the honeycomb blinds that can be bought for the windows. The color was orange. Any ideas what this could be? I've been searching the Web and can't find any pictures that are even similar.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    This could be a dried up and contorted laticed stinkhorn. It could be a dried up Clathrus ruber, or similar, for example.
     
  3. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    It was actually growing quite well until around noon today. Like I said, unfortunately I kicked it over before I took any pictures of it. I thought it may be something one of the dogs had left behind, that was why I had pushed at it with my shoe. I wanted to make sure they (the dogs) weren't sick and leaving something undesirable around the yard. We have a young toddler that likes playing out there too much, and he still puts everything in his mouth! I found some pictures of a similar looking fungus, but this one didn't have any brown or slimy centers around the holes.
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    Is there a point of attachment with the ground? And what does it smell like? Is it brittle or squishy?
     
  5. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    It was attached at the ground, and the entire growth was squishy. I've got some more photos at http://www.flickr.com/photos/21699449@N04/ but I didn't get a very good picture of where the growth was attached. I'll see if I can blow up the picture of where it was growing from.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    I didn't notice any particular smell when I was looking at it.
     
  7. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    Ok, I went back and looked at it again. It's pretty well drying out and shriveling now, but it definitely has a disagreeable odor. Not strong enough to notice when standing up and looking down at it, but I picked up a piece of it and sniffed. Not pleasant.
     
  8. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    your answers are consistent with a 'stinkhorn', but it doesn't look like any stinkhorn I've seen.
     
  9. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    That's why I'm having trouble finding out what it is. I can find all sorts of descriptions that come really close, but no pictures that match (or at least sort of match). It was actually kind of pretty, almost like a glass ball.
     
  10. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    The lattice part looks remarkable similar to the skirting on Phallus indusiatus, but without the protruding top and the skirting wasn't moving easily. The pictures I saw of Phallus indusiatus look much more fragile than the one in the yard. Maybe a young specimen that hadn't finished growing yet? Not sure yet. Will keep looking.
     
  11. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
  12. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    Still don't know what it is called, but that sure seems like the one in my yard.
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,082
    Likes Received:
    321
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Compare Clathrus ruber.
     
  14. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    Yes - Clathrus ruber. See post #2.
     
  15. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    I think you're right, but I have another question. In my google search on Clathrus ruber, all of the information seems to be that these fungi don't like the sun, and will start shriveling up and drying out. The area where I found the one in my yard is a full sun area, absolutely no shade. Would that make a difference? Apparently not, since I found it growing out there with no apparent problems, but it is just a curiosity.
     
  16. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,082
    Likes Received:
    321
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    From the way it is dried out, I guess it didn't like being in full sun!
     
  17. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    I find that these things do the bulk of their growing from sunrise to 10 AM.
     
  18. kacarman

    kacarman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    Thanks for the help! And, I went back and looked one more time, the egg sac was down buried in the grass next to the bush. It was definitely most likely Clathrus ruber.
     

Share This Page