Spider Plant Propagation without cutting?

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by Duncan, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. Duncan

    Duncan Member

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    Hi all,
    This may be a dumb question, but I figured it can't hurt to ask.
    I have a spider plant that has smaller offshoots that are starting to develop roots. Instead of cutting the new plant from the old stem, is it possible to plant the new shoot in a second pot? If this is possible, are there any benefits to having the two root systems feeding the plant?

    Thanks for the thoughts.

    Duncan
     
  2. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    you can "divide" spider plants, but it is best to just wait a while. Soon enough the plant will put out tons of little baby plants on the long spikes. If you only have a little plant and start to cut it up then you will have an uninteresting plant(s) that are painfully slow to develop.
     
  3. Duncan

    Duncan Member

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    Thank you for the reply. I worded my question somewhat poorly, and will rephrase. I already have the spikes which have grown out of the centre of the spider plant with tiny little cuttings and small whitish flowers having developed along the spike. I am wondering, instead of the tradition way of propogating (cutting the little spider plants off the spike and repotting them) I were to merely attempt to root the little spider plants while STILL ATTACHED to the spike (and by ascociation the mother plant), what would happen. Would it take in the soil and have two sources of nutrients, or what would happen. I am interested in trying it and wonder if anyone else has. Thanks!
     
  4. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    I understand. It is generally a good idea to establish a baby plant in another pot before cutting the umbilical anyway. I couldn't imagine any advantage to the mother plant on letting it grow while still attached. As best I understand, the flow of nutrition is one-way; from the mother to the baby.
     
  5. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    you can certainly plant the babies and leave them attached to the mother - for a couple of weeks anyway; just to be sure the roots are fully formed. any longer than that and it may deter the roots from forming. also, leaving them attached to the mom may drain her if they are left on for too long.
     
  6. kma241

    kma241 Member

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    in my experience, the baby spiders do better when i pot them in new soil while STILL connected to the mother plant. i've read to allow them to establish new roots in soil for 7-10 days while still attached, and then just clip the "umbilical" stem. this has been the most successful in my experience - the plants i've done this with are stronger and grow better - i've lost some baby spiders that i cut off the mama before potting.
     
  7. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    As long as there are visible roots on the babies, they should grow just fine in their own small pots without mother hanging around. You can root a couple together if not a third in lets say, 2"-3" pots, water once, then let the soil somewhat dry.
    Babies still attached to mother is just another way to propagate spiders, not necessarily better.
    I know you didn't ask about water rooting, but rooting in water is a good way too, use something small, like a shot glass and keep the water level high enough to just cover just the butt of the babies keeping the leaves above the water line, you might have to remove some of the smaller lower ones.
     
  8. Ottawa-Zone5

    Ottawa-Zone5 Active Member

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    It is no different than some strawberry plants that send out shoots with visible small roots. You can pot it in a small pot whether still connected or separated. Leaving connected assures good rooting befoare connected. Leaving connected helps the new plant but not the other way.
     

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