Sowing samaras directly into flats outside

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Fabrice, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Hi everyone,

    I read somewhere ( can't remember ) one had realized he could reach a higher germination rate by sowing samaras directly into flats and by leaving them outside ( as opposed to the fridge method )
    I have just noticed the other day that my Acer Circinatum had samaras on it .

    I have these flat semi transparent plastic boxes used to store garments/toys under the bed.
    I thought I could give it a try, poke a few holes in the bottom and lid of the box, soak the seeds three days in water, sow them on top of a wet mix of sand and loam, put the lid back on and leave it outside for 6 months.

    Do you think it could work ?

    Thanks

    Fabrice.
     

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  2. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    That's how I do seed. Except I don't soak first, and I put the samaras under about 1 cm of mix. I haven't grown circinatum, but I have loads of palmatum and other species. I leave the flats for 2 years, some seeds are doubly dormant and seem to require it.

    Good luck!

    -E
     
  3. fortyonenorth

    fortyonenorth Member

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    I would only add, and this may be obvious, but if you're using the boxes you described you'll need to drill holes to provide adequate drainage. It may be easier to pick-up a few of the standard black nursery flats. They cost about $1.50 here in the US. Finally, if you're leaving them outside situate them where they won't be subjected to predation by birds and/or rodents.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Thanks !

    I have always bought small grafted maples and for once, I would like to see the magic of growing a plant from A to Z, as we did at school with beans and cotton, and be proud of it.
    Childish, I know... :)
     
  5. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    On the contrary! Seed growing is hugely fun, although it takes a lot of time if you want to grow things on... Personally I'm not interested in naming very much, but so many seedlings have unique character that they really are very individualistic. Some don't grow much root, and some don't live long, so it's a roller coaster.

    As 41 says, drainage. I cover trays with netting to keep out birds and cats, too.

    The Maple Society does a seed exchange each year, you can get some even if you've nothing to contribute.

    cheers,

    -E
     
  6. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    I'll drill holes in the plastic lid and also at the bottom of the box for good drainage.
    Thanks a lot to you all !
     
  7. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    I 'm soaking two specimens for sowing but the two do differently.
    Acer Circinatum samaras I took on my tree have sunk to the bottom
    Acer Pennsylvanicum I had ordered through a renowned firm are still floating after 24 hours.
    They both must soak 3 days.
    Is it too soon to worry about A. Pennsylvanicum ?
    Thanks for your opinion.
     

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