something's up

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by grdnstff, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    hello, all .. looking for enlightenment regarding a climbing rose .. not sure which one .. last year it had what looked like a kind of mildew .. over the winter, i removed all leaves .. last week i was in that garden and saw the new leaves curling, darkening, and looking pretty sad .. even telltale signs of the mildew on these new fresh greens .. i removed all that i saw .. i'm adding two pictures i took, which will hopefully show what i'm attempting to explain .. thanks for any assistance ..
     

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  2. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    It would be highly unusual for your roses to be afflicted by powdery mildew at this time of the year. It tends to be a problem in the warm dry weather of summer. I wonder if the curling is due to frost or cold damage. I thought Vancouver Island wasn't spared the freezing temperatures which ended a week ago?
     
  3. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I agree, it must be in a very protected, warm spot to have that much new growth already. It might have some cold damage, but if it had alot of mildew last year it will get it again this year, you may want to do some preventative spraying now. Some varieties are very mildew prone, if you get tired of it there are some varieties that are disease resistant.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Has white speckles which may be insect frass. Look for bugs.

    Left shot looks like rose could be 'Dr Huey', used as rootstock for many hybrid roses planted here. These have often died and left behind the 'Dr'. If your plant is producing small medium to dark red flowers without much scent chances are very good that is what you have. Often seems to be infested with mosaic virus. I would jerk it out and put it in the trash or burn it.
     
  5. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    i just asked the fellow who owns the rose, what it is, and he tells me it's a 'Tropicana' .. is mosaic virus something that can't be healed? ..
     
  6. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    i might have 'seen' the mildew simply because i'm looking for it, based on what i saw happening with this rose last year .. i hadn't actually thought of cold damage .. it has been pretty chilly here in the last while, but this particular rose lives in a sheltered inside corner of a heated building .. i have such little experience with roses, to this point, that i'm filled with questions .. thanks for taking the time to reply ..
     
  7. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    what would you spray it with?
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Lots of new growth on roses down here. They usually do fire up in Feb.
     
  9. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Just a couple quick thoughts. I may have
    it right and I might not.

    When was the last time this Rose has been fertilized?
    Was there any Calcium in the fertilizer formulation?

    I am not seeing any real gloss to the leaves and a part
    of that is that the new leaves do not have much of a
    cuticle yet. Without a waxy cuticle buildup the tender
    leaves become especially susceptible to cold and
    critter damage such as from aphids, scale and spider
    mites. I am not seeing powdery mildew on this Rose
    yet. The white specks on the surface of the leaves are
    a result from something else. A downward curl to the
    leaves is a disease problem. An upward curl to the edges
    of the leaves indicates a fixable problem. The curled
    and twisted leaves on the photo on the right indicate an
    insect problem to me more so than a disease symptom,
    aside from a perceived nutrient imbalance in this Rose..

    Jim
     
  10. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    so, i'm feeling hopeful .. the upward curl of these leaves could be evidence of .. white fly or aphids? .. then, i could spray with dishsoap/water/oil mixture? .. and, as far as feeding, i'm just about to do a feed/mulch ("organic" fertilizer mixed into compost) .. where would the calcium come in? .. bonemeal? .. the fertilizer mixture is: 4 parts seedmeal, 1 part lime, 1/2 part bonemeal/rock phosphate, 1/2 part kelp meal .. i usually mix up a wheelbarrow full (level-ish) of compost with about a cup of fertilizer, and then use this around the plants in late winter .. i appreciate your thoughts ..
     
  11. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Use this article below as your starting point
    for ideas on Rose fertilizers. I suggest you
    use a commercial granulated fertilizer for
    your Spring application. For you I suggest
    you include about a half cup of Magnesium
    sulfate for this Rose along with about one
    half to one full cup of Lime. If you use the
    Lime you will not need a fertilizer that has
    Calcium in it.

    Consumer Fertilizers: a Review & Analysis

    then, i could spray with dishsoap/water/oil mixture?

    Dish soap and water will work for now but
    if you have Spider mites you will want to
    use something stronger such as an insecticidal
    soap, one that has peppermint oil in it or use
    a couple of ounces of vinegar along with the
    soapy water if you know you have aphids. Too
    early in the season for Whitefly I would think
    where you are.

    Jim
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Strictly speaking soil should be tested before choosing and applying fertilizer. Without a soil analysis report there is not much basis for deciding which nutrients to supplement and how much.
     
  13. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I couldn't see the picture welll enough to make a sure diagonsis. 'Tropicana' is very prone to mildew. The organic product "Serenade' is one I have seen recommended, I'm not sure it is avaiable in Canada, always read and follow the directions on any pesticide.
     
  14. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    .. that makes sense .. sounds a bit more 'scientific' than i'm prone to, but won't let that stop me ..

    thanks
     
  15. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    i'll see if i can find that one .. thank you ..
     
  16. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

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    thanks for the article .. will go read it now .. would that be dolomite lime? .. and, i appreciate the ideas about peppermint oil .. i do have insecticidal soap .. i thought i'd seen whitefly flitting about, but maybe not .. i often find when there are aphids there are whiteflies, so i'll be keeping a look out .. it does still seem a bit cold yet for little critters .. thanks for your time ..
     

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