Solved: Daphne laureola

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by StephenJK, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. StephenJK

    StephenJK Active Member

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    Never seen this before. Plant was small - about a foot tall but with a woody stem. Leaves are large - about 6 inches long. Could be a tree seedling? Found growing near a forested wetland in Snake Lake Park, Tacoma WA.
     

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  2. Margot

    Margot Contributor

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    That sure looks like Daphne laureola to me. If so, tear it out and any other seedlings you may encounter. It is terribly invasive. I've heard many say that this has the potential to challenge Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) as an ongoing threat to native ecosystems. The thing with Spurge Laurel is that it is quite attractive, evergreen and pest-resistant so most people don't recognize it as the growing threat it presents.

    Weed of the Week: Daphne/Spurge-laurel |
     
  3. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Pull them out, then send them back to Europe! It's a quite rare and protected native species in my area... :)
     
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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Needs a shovel or spade to be gotten free of the soil. While you are at it pull up that ivy behind it - in nearby Seattle for instance the majority of wild plant species are of foreign origin. See Jacobson, Wild Plants of Greater Seattle - Second Edition (2008), page 14.
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Wear protective gear as well, it can be irritating to some people.
     
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  6. StephenJK

    StephenJK Active Member

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    Wow...had no idea! I will notify the Nature Center. Thanks to everyone for your comments!
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Reminder that (with the exception of whisky) this word is very offensive to many in Scotland, and should not be used in this context. Thanks.
     
  8. Margot

    Margot Contributor

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    "Scotch broom is said to have been introduced to Vancouver Island from Hawaii in the 1850s by Capt. Walter Calhoun Grant (a Scot) who planted it on his farm near Sooke." Invasive Scotch broom The rest is ongoing history. Who knows why it came to be called 'Scotch' broom since there was no other broom (I know of) growing then to differentiate one from the other.

    My understanding is that the word 'Scotch' is considered pejorative only when applied to people, not to Scotch whisky, pie, broth, eggs – or plants.

    My hope is that geneticists will develop a strain of deer that eats only ***** broom, thereby eliminating 2 problems. :) Then, Spurge Laurel.

    Margot (of Scotch descent)
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    No - it is also considered offensive when applied to most things, whisky excepted (quite why that is excepted, I'm not sure). The reason lies in 'scot*h' being the spelling used by the invading English oppressors, as opposed to their own spelling Scots or Scottish.
     

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