Soil amendment for tree peonies

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by tuffytown, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. tuffytown

    tuffytown Active Member

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    N. Snohomish US
    I will be receiving several Itoh and tree peonies soon. My property is very sandy and fast draining as well as being very acidic. Lots of large fir trees at the upper more shady area.

    I have read that tree peonies like full sun, dappled sun etc. I have also read that they don't like wet feet but also don't like the soil too acid.

    What would be a recommendation for sun exposure and soil amendment for planting. North Snohomish county, zone 8.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    South Okanagan & Greater Vancouver, BC Canada
    I am curious what you have already in your garden that does well in the same bed (or nearby) where you plan to put in your tree peonies

    This then offers some comparison

    I do not have any peonies tho i know people in our neighbourhood who do fine w them. I’ve always heard that once the traditional peonies are happy and bloom well, don’t go moving them around.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If you think your existing soil won't do dig out a bed sized area and replace with soil that seems suitable. Or dump the new soil on top and plant in that, without blending the two soils together.

    Definitely do not mix amendments into the existing soil. This works only when growing short term subjects with small root systems that are adapted to high organic content. Ones like annual flowers and annual vegetables. That are replaced every year, something which allows access for re-amending as needed.
     
  4. tuffytown

    tuffytown Active Member

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    This is a new property for me. My old place was poor draining, this is excessive draining so it is a learning curve for me. There aren't many plants and what is here looks kind of poorly. The rhodies look good as do the sword ferns but the hostas and heuchera look small and unappy.

    I have access to lots of composted horse manure or I can go buy soil improvements. I have a lot of area to put plants into as I like a dense garden.

    Perhaps my best approach is to plant into the existing soil and over dress?
     

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