Hedges: Snow Damaged Hedge

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by PaulFishman, Mar 10, 2007.

  1. PaulFishman

    PaulFishman Member

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    Hi,
    I have a fir hedge that was heavily damaged by all that nasty, wet snow we had. I am wondering if it is at all salvageable and what do I do? I don't mind trimming it down, it was getting too large anyway.
    Thanks
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not quite sure what it is, but it isn't a fir. Possibly juniper or arborvitae, but that's not certain. Can you post a larger close-up of the foliage? That will help with diagnosis.
     
  3. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  4. PaulFishman

    PaulFishman Member

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    Here is a larger photo. It could be cedar? I just want to know if it can be saved. Or how hard is it to remove and replant a smaller one, I am open to suggested replacements if anyone has any ideas?
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 11, 2007
  5. PaulFishman

    PaulFishman Member

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    Does no one have an answer for me? Can these be saved?
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not a cedar, some sort of cypress or arborvitae. I think they'll live, but always look rather ugly. Best replaced, I fear.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    One of the golden Platycladus (Thuja) orientalis cultivars, probably the frequently sold and planted Aureus Nanus. Routinely called Berckman's golden arborvitae, although that name really belongs to another, more pointed introduction called 'Conspicua'.

    Anyway, I think the best course is removal. Smaller replacements can be had comparatively cheaply and easily from local outlets in season, even grocery stores sell this one here. However, since the existing planting has failed maybe another selection would be a better choice.
     
  8. jaro_in_montreal

    jaro_in_montreal Active Member

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    I have a Platycladus (Thuja) orientalis 'Aurea nana', but it doesn't look anything like the plants in the photos -- particularly the unique, vertically-oriented fronds, for which I like the plant so much, are absent in the photos (other very similar cultivars are 'Morgan' and 'Southport').

    But it could well be some other kind of arborvitae.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    They're not vertically oriented because they're flattened by snow. Nevertheless, the sprays can still be seen to be parallel to one another and to be made up of the characteristic foliage.
     
  10. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Form of Thuja orientalis, I think.

    A miserable plant, in my book, because the pruning options for control are virtually nil in the long run.

    Cute when little.

    Like this... http://www.manetti.ch/images/immagini-assortimento/estrat36.jpg

    You won't get new buds on bare stems, so the top has almost nothing to work with.

    You could try shearing a bit of weight off the sides, but you can't take too much green off or you will just end up with a bunch of dead wood.
     

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