In The Garden: Small white flowers

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Chris M, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. Chris M

    Chris M Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    Something I bought at a plant sale that I forgot about. It's in a 3" pot.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,776
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Strawberries?
     
  3. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    This looks like the mayflower or hepatica.
     
  4. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,215
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Thalictrum thalictroides(?)
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Sanguinaria canadensis?
     
  6. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,924
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND.UK
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,429
    Likes Received:
    522
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Concur with Andrey with regard to the above suggestions. Leaves not a match for Sanguinaria, Fragaria or Hepatica.
     
  8. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,215
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    As with many names recently, they change it back and forth. It is head-spinning time in taxonomy and nomenclature.

    For this species, Wikipedia gives short history:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalictrum_thalictroides
     
  9. Chris M

    Chris M Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    It's definitely Thalictrum thalictroides. Now I have to remember why I bought it. :)

    Thanks everybody! What a great forum!
     
  10. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,924
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND.UK
    Thanks Andrey.

    Quote wiki....

    "Originally described as Anemone thalictroides by Linnaeus in 1753. It was transferred to a new, monospecific genus, Anemonella, by Édouard Spach in 1839.[2] Although similar to plants in the genus Thalictrum, Sprach considered the diminutive size, umbelliform inflorescence, and tuberous roots of this species to be distinctive enough to designate a new genus. JRB Boivin considered this distinction suspect, and transferred the species to the genus Thalictrum in 1957.[3] Molecular evidence supports the placement of the species within Thalictrum,[4] and this placement is accepted by several modern treatments.[5]"

    Hmm! Hardy a recent name change! 1957.

    Shame that even famous plants people such as Dan Hinkley show it incorrecly named as Anemonella in his wonderful book.
     
  11. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,215
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    I think it is just a different opinion. "The Plant List" site calls it Anemonella thalictroides (L.) Spach and as a synonym Thalictrum thalictroides (L.) A.J. Eames & B. Boivin.
    http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/tro-27100858
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,762
    Likes Received:
    580
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    The molecular evidence may not be known by everyone. Then there will be those who think molecular evidence does not overrule gross morphology.
     

Share This Page