slumping tree

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by joyemmamiller, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. joyemmamiller

    joyemmamiller Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mesilla, NM
    I have a Twisted Acacia tree, about 12' tall, that is starting to uproot. Because the plant is actually a shrub that can be pruned into a tree shape, perhaps it is top-heavy, but my suspicion is that the roots haven't penetrated the soil downward enough. (I am in the desert but also in a river valley and the soil is clay heavy.) Is there a way to penetrate the soil and loosen it / add gravel to encourage the roots to go downward?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,033
    Likes Received:
    259
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Probably root-bound, from having been left in a pot too long at some point. This is very common in this age of container production of nursery stock. If that is the case with your tree, all you can do is install a firm stake or pole, attach it to that.
     
  3. joyemmamiller

    joyemmamiller Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mesilla, NM
    Thanks- I'll get on it.
     
  4. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,525
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    They are not that long lived either as a rule 10-15 ys . I have just had very mature black wattle trees (25+ yrs) turn their toes up because of dry weather and age. They were in good soil.

    Liz
     
  5. Hartley Botanic

    Hartley Botanic Active Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Uk
    Sorry to hear this happened but that wording made me smile :)
     
  6. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,525
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    Black wattles ( Acacia mearnsii)
    http://asgap.org.au/APOL19/sep00-4.html
    normally do the "toe turning" at a fairly young age. Mine were good specimens and already large when I came here 25+ yrs ago so they have had a good innings. The drought has also killed my beautiful blackwood (Acacia melanoxylon)
    http://www.anbg.gov.au/acacia/species/A-melanoxylon.html
    which was a very fine specimen. All the ones down on the main road have had to be removed as they were crashing down all over the place. Hopefully with the fair bit of rain there will be a lot of regeneration. Our road edges here are still natural bush and in my case this extends into the bottom paddock. Re expression fairly common here. I thought it was one of yours from whence we source a few. :)

    Liz
     

Share This Page