Identification: Skagway

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by bpither, Jun 6, 2015.

  1. bpither

    bpither Active Member

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    On the way to the Chilkoot Trail near Skagway, Alaska on June 6. I think I can identify a couple of them ...
     

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  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    1 - Fritillaria camschatcensis
    2 - Cornus canadensis
    3 - Cornus ?sericea
    4 - Aruncus dioicus
    5 - Viburnum opulus
     
  3. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

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    looks like a very special place. thanks for posting.
     
  4. bpither

    bpither Active Member

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    Are you certain about the Viburnum opulus Trylych? That was the one I was having trouble with ...
     
  5. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Hard to be sure, just one picture..., do you know what color have fruts when ripe?
     
  6. bpither

    bpither Active Member

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    No idea ... I'm just travelling through.
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Certainly a Viburnum, but I'd agree, it doesn't look right for V. opulus.
     
  8. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Viburnum edule is the only Viburnum listed by USDA for Alaska.
     
  9. bpither

    bpither Active Member

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    I looked up the images of Viburnum edule and am pretty sure that's what it was ...
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I would lean more toward Cornus unalaschkensis for the second photo.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Viburnum opulus produces distinctly lobed leaves and terminal fruit clusters - it is really quite different from V. edule, yet gets sold in its place by nurseries. This is probably because it is naturalized in parts of North America outside of its native range. In my area you have to hunt for V. edule in the mountains whereas V. opulus can rather often be found growing as a weed within the metropolitan area.

    Rhododendron ponticum has likewise been on the local market for some time as R. macrophyllum. I talked to the grower who was the source of this mistake, he had taken cuttings from a plant found growing on unoccupied property and figured because it was growing wild it must be the native species.
     

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